Category Archives: Screening tests

WHO Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale – Printable

 6 Questions for Recognizing ADHD in Adults    Never    Rarely     Seldom         Often     Very

   Often

   1. How often do you have difficulty concentrating on what people are saying to you, even when they are speaking to you directly?        0         1           2         4        5
    2. How often do you leave your seat in meetings or other situations in which you are expected to remain seated?        0          1            2          4        5
    3. How often do you have difficulty unwinding or relaxing when you have time to yourself?        0           1            2          4        5
   4. When you’re in a conversation, how often do you find yourself finishing the sentences of the people you are talking to before they can finish them themselves?        0           1            1           2       2
    5. How often do you put things off until the last minute?        0           1            2           3        4
    6. How often do you depend on others to keep your life in order and attend to details?        0           1            1            2         3

The total number of available points is 24. Recommend further testing with 14 and above.

Press Control-P to Print    WHO Adult ADHD Self-Report Screening Scale http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/2616166

Response to Treatment Rating Scales

 

How will you know when you have the right ADHD medication and dosage?

TRACK YOUR OWN or your CHILD’S RESPONSE to TREATMENT!   

You can’t notice small improvements or side effects without a monitoring sheet. The goal is to find the best results with the fewest side effects. Finding the right medication and dosage is seldom a straightforward process. It usually involves medication trials and may require many adjustments to dial in just the right combination.  The better you keep track of improvements or problems, the more likely to best the best results from treatment. Don’t waste time or suffer needlessly on the incorrect type and/or dosage of medication.

Your prescriber may slowly increase the dosage, then back off when side effects begin to interfere. Other times, they will switch to a different type of medication altogether. It will depend on what you have to report. Even if you use supplements like Omega 3 Fatty Acids, how will you know whether they are helping if you don’t record what changes, if any, occur?  For more on the alchemy of prescribing ADHD medication, see ADDitude Magazine’s 10 Medication Fallacies even Doctors Believe.

Dr. Charles Parker and Core Psych have numerous videos on the specifics of different ADHD medications and tracking an individual’s response to treatment.  Try the comprehensive and unique book on the subject that is reasonably priced ($6 to $15): Link works –  New ADHD Medication Rules – Brain Science & Common Sense. (Link works)

Pencil-and-paper treatment monitoring system developed by David Rabiner, Ph.D. Instructions provided for accurate reports. Download for free    (Link works or copy and paste http://www.helpforadd.com/monitor.pdf )

Medication Effects Rating Scales Children and Adolescents or Adults – Record changes observed and any negative side effects   Arlington Center for ADD

Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale – Track your child’s emotional and behavioral response to treatment.

Return to ADHD Screening Tests

Other tests include:

Screening Evaluation Forms – Printable – For both Children and Adults (If this will not link: Copy and paste https://addfreesources.net/screening-evaluation-forms/

Online ADHD Tests

Response to Treatment Rating Scales – Children and adults

FREE Professional ADHD Assessment Forms – Children and adults

 

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FREE Professional ADHD Assessment Forms

Professional ADHD Assessment Forms – No charge

CADDRA ADHD Assessment Toolkit 2011 –  48 page PDF with recommended assessment forms, screeners, and rating scales from the Canadian ADHD Resource Alliance.  Includes SNAP, Weiss Assessment forms, and others. Rating scales are for suitable for educators, children, adolescents, and adults.

 Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) was designed as a brief behavioral screening questionnaire about 3-16-year-olds. It now has a version for 2 to 4-year-olds as well as one for over 18  – 25 questions – Choose from a wide variety of forms in a number of languages. Impact and follow-up versions are also available. Scoring is quite complex. Setting up an account to have them do it for 25 cents is difficult as well!

The Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale can be completed by parents and/or teachers to report the presence and frequency of symptoms of ADHD, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, and Conduct Disorder (Pelham, Gnagy, Greenslade & Milich, 1992)

The Impairment Rating Scale is a form that can be used by parents and teachers to indicate the impact of ADHD symptoms on important functional domains. (Fabiano et al., 2006)

The DIVA 5.0 – Diagnostic Interview for Adult ADHD. Sorry, there is now a charge for accessing this screener. DIVA 5.0 is based on the criteria for ADHD in DSM-IV. It assesses ADHD symptoms in adulthood as well as childhood, chronicity of these symptoms, and significant clinical or psycho-social impairments due to these symptoms. (Translated into about five languages so far. See Diva 2.0 for more.

DIVA.20  was developed in Dutch and translated into many different languages. Please donate to keep this instrument available at low costs for research and clinical assessment purposes.

 

ADHD Screening Tests

Printable Screening Evaluation Forms (Will not link: Copy and paste https://addfreesources.net/screening-evaluation-forms/ (Print out and score yourself)

Response to Treatment Rating Scales – Children and adults

 

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ADHD Screening Evaluation Forms

Return to ADHD Screening Tests

Other tests include:

Online ADHD Tests

Response to Treatment Rating Scales – Children and adults

FREE Professional ADHD Assessment Forms – Children and adults

Screening Evaluation Forms (Print out and score yourself)

For Parents and Teachers

SNAP IV – 18 questions – Teacher and Parent Rating Scale by James Swanson, Ph.D. (Link works – Or copy and paste http://www.myadhd.com/snap-iv-6160-18sampl.html)

Vanderbilt Assessment Scale 10 page PDF

  • Includes Parent Informant form – 55 questions
  • Teacher Informant form- 55 questions
  • Scoring information
  • and Assessment Follow-up

NICHQ Vanderbilt Assessment Follow-up For teachers – Easy to fill out on-line, print out or email results to provider- Use Zero as a circle. 18 questions plus 8 questions evaluating performance.

Extensive SWAN Scale – Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD Symptoms and Normal Behavior – 90 questions – 30 for strengths

SWAN Strengths – 18 questions rating scale includes positive “weaknesses” and negative “strengths” scoring, assessing symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Parents are asked to compare their child’s behavior in a variety of settings over the past month to other children on a 7-point: 3-Far below, 2-Below, 1-Slightly below, 0-Average, -1-Slightly average, -2-Above, -3-Far above. Higher scores indicate greater symptomology.

Child and Teen ADHD rating scale IV (home version)
• ADHD rating scale IV (school version)
• ADHD rating scale IV (self-report version) – All have 18 questions

ADD (ADHD) Self-report Questionnaire for Teenage/College-age Girls – PDF page 1 – 15 questions – Kathleen G. Nadeau, Ph.D. and Patricia Quinn, M.D.

The Ultimate ADHD Test for Teens – ADDitude Magazine reports on yet another questionnaire by Kathleen Nadeau and Patricia Quinn

 

Evaluation Forms For Adults (Print out)

6 Questions for recognizing ADHD in AdultsProposed version of the WHO Adult ADHD Self-Report screener listed below. Developed in 2017 by researchers to include non-DSM-5 questions that relate to Executive Functions.  Free Printable 

Adult ADHD Self-Report Scales (ASRS-V 1.1) Printable 6 question Screener Printable 18 Question version. Developed in conjunction with the World Health Organization (WHO), and the Workgroup on Adult ADHD at Harvard University –  Quick and easy tests screen for ADHD symptoms in adults.  The ASRS-V Screeners are also available in over 20 languages through Harvard’s website. *Adult ADHD Self-Report – 6 Questions with on-line scoring *

Russell Barkley’s Proposed Adult Checklist – Page 10 from a Sample Chapter from Barkley’s “Taking Charge of Adult ADHD” (2007) See pages 5 and 6 for additional symptoms.

Dr. Daniel Amen’s Adult ADHD Symptom Checklist – 77 questions

Symptom Tracker – Discussion Guide for Children and Adults – Vyvanse

Self-test for Women: Do I have ADHD – PDF: Compilation of other women’s rating forms – Print out to share with your Doctor

 

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WHO ADHD Adult Self-Report Scale

Proposed World Health Organization (WHO)

ADHD Adult Self-Report Scale –   Free Printable 

     6 Questions for Recognizing ADHD in Adults    Never    Rarely     Seldom         Often     Very

   Often

   1. How often do you have difficulty concentrating on what people are saying to you, even when they are speaking to you directly?        0         1           2         4        5
    2. How often do you leave your seat in meetings or other situations in which you are expected to remain seated?        0          1            2          4        5
    3. How often do you have difficulty unwinding or relaxing when you have time to yourself?        0           1            2          4        5
   4. When you’re in a conversation, how often do you find yourself finishing the sentences of the people you are talking to before they can finish them themselves?        0           1            1           2       2
    5. How often do you put things off until the last minute?        0           1            2           3        4
    6. How often do you depend on others to keep your life in order and attend to details?        0           1            1            2         3

 The total number of available points is 24.

Recommend further testing with screening scores of 14 and above.   

For further information see:

6 Questions for Recognizing ADHD in Adults

Source:  

The World Health Organization Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Self-Report Screening Scale for DSM-5 

Authors: Berk Ustun, MS1; Lenard A. Adler, MD2,3; Cynthia Rudin, PhD4,5; et al

http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/2616166

Brief Screening Tool for Adult ADHD Released

Copy and Paste: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/878810?src=wnl_edit_tpal&uac=150032AY#vp_2