Category Archives: Find Treatment and Support

Self-Regulation: Controlling your emotions with ADHD

 “Emotions motivate action — action to engage or action to avoid.” By Joan Jager

Emotional dysregulation, while often thought as a lack of self-control, is now recognized as a core symptom of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.  Self-Regulation is a non-shaming way to express the necessary steps to learning to control your emotions with ADHD.  For more than 10 years, the model of Executive Functions, or rather of delayed development of Executive Functions better explains the impact of ADHD than do the symptoms of a variable of attention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity.

Executive functions affect the ability to control one’s actions and reactions toward a future goal. They include problems with concentration, memory, staying on task, organization, planning, prioritizing, waiting your turn, restlessness, and more. Drs. Russell Barkley and Thomas Brown now propose that emotional regulation is one of the basic Executive Functions affected by ADHD. Research indicates emotional regulation difficulties have the greatest impact on an individual with ADHD’s well-being and self-esteem (far more than the core symptoms of hyperactivity and inattention).  (Source) For this reason, researchers are pushing for emotional dysregulation to be included in the description of ADHD in the next DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.)

Thomas E. Brown, Ph.D., author of  Smart But Stuck: Emotions in Teens and Adults with ADHD explains emotional dysregulation as a function of working memory impairments and poor connectivity between areas of the brain that modify emotions.  Being unable to recall past experiences, momentary emotions can become overpowering. Some people turn that upset against themselves while others express their feelings outwardly and react angrily, sometimes even violently. Source)

Dr. Brown notes that an individual with ADHD may:

  • be quick to get frustrated by minor annoyances
  • worry too much or too long about even small things
  • have trouble calming down when annoyed or angry
  • feel wounded or take offense at even gentle criticism
  • feel excessive urgency to get something they want immediately

Unfiltered emotions can have a positive or negative effect.  In How ADHD Triggers Intense Emotions, Dr. Brown continues, “Emotions motivate action — action to engage or action to avoid.”   Dr. William Dodson calls this the “Interest Driven Nervous System” and suggests that the ADHD brain is largely activated by “interest, challenge, novelty, urgency, or passion.” It is these properties rather than the traditional motivators of importance, long-term reward and “shoulds” that propel forward action. Happily, the feeling of being under stress can also be expressed as excitement. This can propel rather than deter action. With self-awareness, and through practicing new coping skills, you change your perception. Fear and shame, looming deadlines, and desperation do NOT have to be the only tools at your disposal. (Sources: One and Two)

 

 Your emotions affect everything you do. Negative emotions can delay necessary action indefinitely. As coach Lou Brown explains, “Individuals rely on emotional self-regulatory skills to enhance or subdue an emotional response and thereby protect goal attainment (as well as social relationships, health, and wellbeing).” (Source)

 

One may also get carried away with positive feelings, develop unwise crushes on people or get fixated on projects that divert them from normal activities. Both positive and negative emotions, when taken to the extreme, can be overwhelming and damaging. Although this article focuses on negative feelings, the excitement that propels an inordinate focus, what some call their “Super Powers,” is also difficult to break away from.  This often causes a life imbalance between work, daily chores, play, and relationships.  If you miss sleep, fail to eat, cannot pay your bills, or keep your home life and finances in order, you may be in over your head. You can get help to attend to these boring tasks and regain a healthy balance, but first, you have to overcome self-criticism that says you are a failure if you cannot do it all yourself.

Author of the book Understand Your Brain, Get More Done, Ari Tuckman, Psy.D., MBA, explains some of the consequences of these out of control thoughts and poorly thought out actions.

“Runaway emotions cause more than drama. They undermine relationships, sap motivation, and lead to regretful actions… “What might take an hour for others to calm down from, could take someone with ADHD the whole day.”

Answers to Emotion Commotion

 

I’ve found some favorite articles and provide a synopsis of some great tips for controlling your emotions below. For greater detail, I recommend that you read the articles in their entirety.I’ve used many of these ideas over the years with some success.  (I’m not done working on controlling my emotions as yet. Nor do I ever expect to be. I often have to change approaches when they just plain stop working for me or my circumstances change.)

 

ADHD and 8 Strategies you can use to Control your Emotions by ADHD Coach Marla Cummins focuses on developing an awareness of how ADHD impacts YOUR life and maintaining basic self-care. Answers to ADHD, like your symptoms, are uniquely individual. Take the time and try many approaches to find the right ones for you.

  • Practice good self-care – (lIKE REMEMBERING TO EAT AND SLEEP!) Self-care is a basic tenet for controlling all aspects of ADHD.
  • Be aware of cues that indicate your emotions are ramping up
  • Pause – Give yourself time to think before your emotions build up.
  • Question your thoughts – They may be distorted or automatic negative thoughts.
  • Treat other conditions that also affect (Depression or anxiety for instance)
  • Think ahead – What triggers you or make you feel uncomfortable? What might you do instead?
  • Remember this too shall pass – Give yourself the time you need to allow the feelings to settle down.
  • Own it – You will goof up. Explain. Apologize, Try to make it right. And try to move on…

A different plan of attack is offered by other ADHD experts interviewed by Margarita Tartakovsky in Coping with Heightened Emotions.

  • Avoid criticizing yourself.
  • Know yourself.
  • Be clear about interruptions.
  • Set boundaries
  • Exercise
  • Feel your feelings
  • Practice self-soothing techniques.
  • See your doctor about medication changes. (or explore the possibility of other conditions that may be contributing factors.)

I also like many of the 15 Good Habits Your Brain Craves (But Isn’t Getting) by Ari Tuckman,  Psy.D., MBA. These habits include:

  • Manage your stress.
  • Avoid over-committing yourself.
  • Make time for yourself.
  • Take a break.
  • Train others to talk you down.
  • Don’t take things personally that have little to do with you.
  • Separate feeling from acting.
  • Educate others about your emotional patterns.

 

Just knowing that your emotions are extra sensitive and can cause inordinate problems in someone with ADHD is the first step.  For me, fear, doubt, self-criticism, shame, and sometimes anger at other people or projects that also demand your attention can be paralyzing. Letting go, moving on, and even getting anything done seems impossible.  Despite years of practice, my emotions still get in the way sometimes.   I’m tired of being “Smart but Stuck.” Today I am more aware of what’s happening, treat myself with kindness, define the problems and try strategies that bring peace and forward movement. Every day is a chance to move forward.  Hope you find some help here for yourself as well.

 

By Joan Jager: Editor and sometimes author of ADD freeSources.net. Also the Curator for associated Pinterest and Facebook pages.

 

Editor’s note: For a more technical explanation of how emotions relate to ADHD, see Thomas Brown’s  NEW Understandings of ADHD: The role of emotion. These slides from the Burnet Seminar offer some Key Takeaways. These examples give way to more accessible language for most of the presentation. “Chemistry of motivation is modulated by complex processes resulting from amygdalar integration of idiosyncratic emotion-laden memories embedded in perceptions and various cognitive networks. “Also, Working memory & focusing impairments characteristic of ADHD may impair motivation by causing emotional flooding or constricted focus.

Please see Rollercoasters and Eggshells by Lou Brown for a very personal viewpoint on emotional dysregulation and its impact on her life and her relationship with her family.

Photo by Simon Zhu on Unsplash – Person with incense – Modified on Canva.com

 

 

 

 

9 Ways to Get Organized with Minimal Effort

By Donna Smallin Kuper

If you want a cleaner, happier home, stop wishing you had a magic wand and become the magic wand!

Here are 9 super-easy things you can do that will have you feeling more organized in no time. Ready? The quicker you get started, the sooner you’ll be done. It really doesn’t matter where you start.

  • Start somewhere, anywhere. I’ve always said that the hardest part of getting organized is getting started. It really doesn’t matter where you start. Maybe start with the most visible stuff. For example, clear the floor in your bedroom or the counter tops in your kitchen. Or start with something small like a purse or junk drawer.

 

  • Break large projects into mini-projects. Get organized one drawer, one shelf, one space at a time. Make a point to keep your project small enough to finish in 15-30 minutes max.

 

  • Example #1: To declutter your closet, move the clothes you love and wear to one end of the clothes rod. Then, working for just 15 minutes at a time or by the yard on your closet rod, try on each item. If it fits and makes you feel fabulous, hang it back up with other keepers. Once that’s done, go through your shoes and then your purses and accessories. Or tackle the floor and then the shelves.

 

  • Example #2: Go through papers one pile at a time. Flip the pile over and you’ll find the oldest stuff at the bottom, a lot of which may now be outdated and easy to toss/shred. Set a timer for 5-10 minutes and keep going until the timer stops.

 

  • Declutter in short bursts. You don’t have to give up your entire weekend to get organized. Look for opportunities to do a little decluttering here and there throughout the day. For example:

 

  • When you file a document, do a quick search in the folder for papers that are outdated.
  • While you’re waiting for a pot of water to boil, straighten up your pantry.
  • While watching television, take advantage of commercial breaks to sort through a pile of papers, fold laundry, or declutter a drawer that you remove from its cabinet before sitting down.
  • Take five minutes every night to pick up and put away items that belong elsewhere and generally tidy up. To get into the habit of doing this, do it right after something you always do- like brushing your teeth.

 

  • Stop fighting with your stuff. Does this sound like you? You try to get organized by putting things where you think they should go. And you find yourself repeatedly putting away the same things. Solution: Create a home for those things where they “want” to live.

 

Example: Set a decorative box or basket on the end of your kitchen counter to be a drop box for the mail and other items such as your cell phone, purse, sunglasses, and keys that always end up there.

 

  • Get “appy.” Use apps like OfferUp https://offerup.com/ to quickly sell items you no longer love or use. Use an app like Paprika http://www.paprikaapp.com/ to digitally store and organize your recipes. Look for other ways to minimize paper such as paperless statements for your bank and credit card accounts and apps like Shoeboxed for storing digital images of receipts. (A free D-I-Y version is available.)

 

  • Act as if you are organized. – and you will become more organized. Do organized people just set things down anywhere? No, they put them away. It only takes a few moments to unload that shopping bag or hang up your coat. The trick is training yourself to do it! It’s a habit that your future self with thank you for.

 

  • Let go of perfect. Done is perfect. You don’t have to have a perfectly organized pantry to reap the benefits of organizing. You also don’t have to find the perfect recipient for every item that leaves your home. Donate everything to one charity and let them do what they do best.

 

Start somewhere, anywhere. Let go of perfect.Be grateful for all that you have – It’s more than enough.

 

  • Practice gratitude. Be grateful for all you have – It’s more than enough. Remember that the most important things in life are not things. No amount of things can ever replace the people we love and it’s that love that makes a home a home.

 

  • Get free support. Join the Unclutter Facebook page for free organizing support! (Link works.) You can ask questions and get help anytime you need it from me as well as other members – people like you who want to live a less cluttered life. It’s a private group so all posts can be seen only by members.

 

About the author: Organizing and cleaning expert, Donna Smallin Kuper, aka The One-Minute Organizer.  Donna is the author of a dozen best selling books on uncluttering, organizing, cleaning and simplifying life. Her newest book is Clear the Clutter, Find Happiness. LINK WORKS)

Original article: http://www.unclutter.com/9-ways-get-organized-minimal-effort/

Contact Donna through Unclutter.com http://www.unclutter.com

 

Spark of light photo by Mervyn Chan on Unsplash Modified on Canva.com

(2nd Image courtesy of nirots/FreeDigitalPhoto.net) Modified on Canva – www.canva.com

 

 

ADHD Life: Beyond a Textbook Understanding

Never stop learning and adapting. September 2017

 

None of us really stops learning. And, when you’re dealing with ADHD, your need to know more AND to apply that knowledge in your family or work life never ends.

Our feature article this month, “Think you Understand ADHD? Don’t leave out the best parts!” by ADHD Parent coach and educator, Yafa Luria Crane, MA, MS, MEd, helps clear up some common misconceptions about ADHD.

Talking about ADHD as a deficit is not the only, nor the most helpful, way to think about ADHD. The best understanding is comprehensive – it is a biological, mental, and emotional difference.”

“We don’t need a “cure” for ADHD – ADHD is our genius. We need support… But every human, including the coolest, most successful people in the world, needs support.”

Parents need support too! On Facebook, the Honestly ADHD Parent Support group and Impact ADHD Parent community are both quite good. For other online and in-person to meet your needs see: Find Support for ADHD.

Diane Dempster, another Parent coach and co-founder of Impact ADHD,  shares 5 Tips to Make Life Easier as an ADHD Parent.

For more specific strategies for your children for school or at home, see Organization for Children: Supporting Executive Functions by Cindy Goldrich, Ed.M, ACAC.

 

Yes, having ADHD can be challenging but you CAN develop tools that help. We can choose to ignore our symptoms and roll with the punches or we can identify our problem areas and find ways to cope more effectively.  Happy (aka Meagan) of Happy Hyper Shiny outlines a few ways she finds calm, keeps track of her thoughts and belongings and makes sure that things get done in ADHD CHOICES: Things I CAN do! She says:

“I don’t have to subject my family to my crazy.” 

“I am still a work in progress. We all are.”  

“But my thought process has changed.”

“There is a lot more I CAN do than I give myself credit for.”

 

Are you learning new skills to help you design your life to work for your needs?

If you’re thinking of starting a side-gig or other project outside of a traditional workplace, check out these tips for Working from Home with ADHD by Sara Jane Keyser – It’s all about balance, organization, and planning, so these strategies are always good advice.

 

 

FREE Resources

This summer I realized that I needed more structure to my days and started using a weekly planner with good results. Having a written schedule allows me to plan and execute projects more effectively. I have even keep on top of Important but Boring tasks by breaking them down into doable steps. Together, these small actions add up and have helped me get things done that I had put off for months and even years.

Emily Ley sells a good planner, but she also offers a collection of Printables that I like. (Basic, Simple to use and FREE) Remember, with ADHD, it’s SO important to WRITE things down. Don’t depend on your memory. Keeping a to-do list or a done-list is a start, but there are many more tools to help you be more effective.

For other ideas, from the simple to the more complex, see my latest Pinterest Board, Planners, Journals, and Notebooks.

 

Videos:

Loomis and the Lust (3 minutes) What it is like to cope with ADD on a daily basis, from being at school to going on a date. In the video, the band has tried to visually capture what it feels like, at times, to have ADD. (With a little light-heartedness thrown in)

 

For more great videos, from informative to inspiring, see our ADHD in Video section.

 

I found a great Resource for Parents from our guest author, Yafa Crane Luria, MA, MS, MEd,  ADHD Parent coach, and educator. Her ADHD Question and Answer Video Collection  offers over 100 short videos about parenting children with ADHD.  For more information and freebies, see her blog, Blocked to Brilliant: Parenting your Awesome ADHD Child.

The number one thing that children object to is yelling. It’s perfectly understandable that a parent’s frustration with a child’s behavior spills over and out, but it’s scary and generally ineffective with children with ADHD at inspiring the behavior you’d like to see.

How do I stop yelling? (3-minututes)

Another all too common parenting response may be spanking. But, is it effective? Or does it only cause harm?  “Is it ever Okay to spank your ADHD child?”  (1 ¼ -minute)

See our Pinterest boards or Facebook page for more resources to add to your understanding of ADHD and to learn new coping skills for yourself and your family.

Thank you for your time,

Joan Jager

 

(Title Photo courtesy of arztsamui/FreeDigitalPhoto.net) Modified on Canva.com

(Parenting Photo courtesy of Photostock/FreeDigitalPhoto.net) Modified on Canva.com.

(Working Photo courtesy of Vlado/FreeDigitalPhoto.net) Modified on Canva.com

The ADD Journey

Living successfully with ADHD. Help for the road ahead.by Cynthia Hammer, M.S.W.

Help for the Road Ahead

 

Stage I: “The Journey Begins” (Discovery and Diagnosis)

Relief: “Finally, an explanation!

For many adults, discovering they have ADD, usually by reading an article, a book or seeing something on television, is a very emotional moment. People at this point in time are usually very excited. They want to talk. They want to tell their story. They want to be understood now that they are starting to understand themselves. Most want to immediately seek a professional diagnosis so they can move forward with treatment. But, do your research first. Start with a few Reputable ADHD Websites and maybe one of these 13 Classic Books on ADHD. 

  • If you’ve begun to wonder why you or your child are different from their peers and encountering problems at, school, work, or home and perhaps having social difficulties. You’ll find a number of  RESOURCES with some answers for you here.
  • One of the first steps is awareness of what ADHD looks like in children and adults. You’ll find a number of informal and formal ADHD symptoms checklists as well as the official criteria for diagnosing ADHD in our ADHD Screening Tests section.
  • Diagnosing ADHD can be difficult. For more information, see A Short but Solid Evaluation for ADHD by Joel Nigg, Ph.D. for ADDitude Mag.
  • Find Treatment and Support for ADHD

 

Stage II: “Wandering in the Wilderness” (Increasing Awareness)

This stage is marked by a variety of feelings and questions.

  • Denial: “How do I know this is a valid disorder?”
  • Flickering Optimism: “Maybe there is hope.”
  • Fear, anxiety, and more anxiety: “What if I follow through with treatment, but nothing changes? All that effort and for what?” Another failure?” “Is medication safe? If I use it, will I have to take it for the rest of my life?”
  • Grief, Anger, and Resentment: “Why wasn’t this diagnosed and treated sooner?”

Stage III: “Up and Over the Mountain Top” (Restructuring)

At this stage, the ADDult no longer puts his energy into “What might have been ….” She moves forward with her life, focusing on what works and minimizing the impact of what does not. Some ADDults go to bed in Stage II and wake up in Stage III. It is hard to predict when or why the transition occurs, but it does, and it feels good! In Stage III, ADDults feel less shame about their disorder. They feel more empowered and more comfortable with telling others about their condition. Stage III involves:

  • Accepting: “I’m ready to let go of the past. I want to get on with my life.”
  • Delegating; Using Strategies and Accommodations: “Could some else more easily do this task?” “What strategies can I use, what accommodations can I request to accomplish my goals?”

 

Stage IV: “Enjoying the Peaceful Valley”(Self-Acceptance)

Along your journey, you have enjoyed the occasional oasis…the moments when you recognize and praise yourself for new behaviors, small accomplishments, and completed tasks. You note where you started and how far you have come. The journey has been difficult, (and often you wanted to quit or turn back), but you realized you were making progress toward your destination. By noting the oases along the way, you confirm for yourself that you are traveling in the right direction, on the right road and keep you nourished for continued travel.

Eventually, you reach a point in your journey when you are traveling light. You no longer carry baggage from your past. You are a seasoned traveler, good at figuring out how to pass through this rough landscape. You are confident in your abilities and strong in your knowledge of having survived. You know your journey will get easier–that you will even start to enjoy it. You continue to journey, but now you travel without needing guides and fellow travelers. You journey down the open road of life, sometimes skipping, sometimes trudging, sometimes limping, but now there is usually a song in your heart, a twinkle in your eye, and a smile on your face. It is good to notice another oasis just ahead. Your journey of life has become the adventure you have always looked for.

Everyone on an ADD JOURNEY needs guides and fellow travelers to show the way and provide support when we weaken and falter. Our guides and fellow travelers provide the six essentials of multi-modal ADD treatment.

  1. Diagnosis
  2. Education
  3. Support
  4. Medication
  5. Counseling
  6. Coaching

RESOURCES

Find Treatment and Support for ADHD

Find an ADHD coach

Just as the wise backpacker carries the ten essentials (1) when out trekking, the journeying ADDult needs to have the ADD treatment essentials at hand. Whether or not all treatments get used during the journey depends on the traveler. Some need to employ all treatments; others, only a few. Below is a chart showing which Guide or Fellow Traveler is most suitable for each stage of the journey

TREATMENT GUIDE/FELLOW TRAVELER STAGE
Diagnosis Psychologist, Psychiatrist, Counselor or Primary Care Physician I
Education and Support Education and Support Groups Self-education Self-Help Groups Friends and Family I and II,
I and II,
II and III
Medication (and/or Alternative Treatments) Psychiatrist, Primary Care Physician (and/or Alternative Health Care Providers) II, III, and IV
Counseling (and Therapy Groups) Counselor, Psychologist or
Psychiatrist
II and III
Coaching Professional Coach or Coaching Partner III

WHO ARE YOUR GUIDES FOR STAGES I AND II?

Psychiatrists are medical doctors who specialize in helping people with mental health problems. Their training includes medical school and usually a three-year postgraduate residency. One advantage of their training is that it enables them to understand, use, and prescribe medications. With respect to ADHD, this is a definite advantage, since ADD treatment usually includes medication. In addition to psychiatrists, other medical doctors along with physician assistants and some nurse practitioners have prescriptive authority. However, none of them do psychological testing.

Sometimes psychological testing is recommended–not to make the ADD diagnosis–but to gain other information on the person’s functioning. Only psychologists do this kind of testing. So, at times, an adult seeking an ADD diagnosis may see several different professionals. Some adults see several experts for another reason. They cannot find a knowledgeable helper. Sadly, many mental health professionals are not knowledgeable about adult ADD. They may look at it as either a “made up” or an over-diagnosed problem. Since mental health professionals are not used to working with adult ADD patients, it is likely that they may believe another problem is dominant.

Professionals in any field tend to “see” only what they know. If they don’t know or understand something, they can’t see or treat it. For example, the psychologist may see your problem mainly as depression or anxiety (especially if you are a woman), not recognizing the ADD as the underlying concern. How you feel about your life because of your untreated ADD may cause you to be depressed or anxious. ADD may be your primary problem, but other problems may need treatment as well.

In evaluating a mental health professional’s knowledge about ADD in adults, many of the following questions could be asked. Most of these questions could also be asked of ADD counselors and ADD coaches.

  1. Do you accept my insurance? Do you diagnose ADD/ADHD?
  2. How long have you been diagnosing this disorder in adults?
  3. How many ADD/ADHD adults have you diagnosed in the past five years. What percent of your practice has a primary diagnosis of ADD/ ADHD?
  4. How familiar are you with the day to day tribulations of having ADD? (You’re trying to learn if they or someone they are close to has this condition. How intimate is their understanding of ADD on a daily basis?)
  5. What is your treatment philosophy? (Will the clinician work with you and be open to suggestions or will he/she call all the shots. Is their treatment of ADD the same for everyone or is it individually tailored?)
  6. In a subtle way, learn what they do to keep current in their knowledge about adult ADD and its treatment protocols.
  7. How do you make a diagnosis? How many visits will it take and how much will it cost?
  8. How long will I have to wait for an appointment?
  9. Ask psychologists how they handle the medication part of treatment.
  10. Ask physicians (and other medical personnel with prescriptive authority) what medicines they use to treat ADD/ADHD.

YOUR GUIDES FOR STAGES II AND III – Therapists and Coaches

Counselors/Therapists: Often, after being diagnosed with ADD, it is a good idea to find a therapist with you whom you can work. Many times adults with ADD have become so mired in negative feelings about themselves that the first thing they need to do is to face these feelings directly and learn how to let them go. Besides dealing with the ADD symptoms themselves, there may be depression, anxiety, or other problems that need to be addressed.

A good therapist can help you develop practical ways to deal with your daily life based on your own problems and circumstances. You will develop insights into how your ADD symptoms have interacted throughout your life, which is likely to help you understand why your life has taken a certain direction. It is our belief that a good therapist will educate you thoroughly about ADD.

Individual therapy is the most likely choice because most people prefer the privacy of a one-to-one relationship with a mental health professional. In individual therapy you and your therapist talk about your particular problems and develop ways in which you can deal with them more effectively. You will probably see your therapist once each week, although the schedule may later change. Visits usually last about forty-five to fifty minutes. After the initial screening is completed, you and the therapist will spend your visits talking about specific challenges, developing coping strategies, sharing new insights, and whatever concerns are on your mind.

The therapy will vary according to the therapist’s orientation. For example, one therapist may help you listen to your negative thoughts and get you to actively challenge them. This method is central to cognitive therapy. Another therapist may help you develop strategies for actively confronting and, hopefully, overcoming the ADD symptoms that make your life less than optimal. Often you will gain insight as therapy proceeds. You may have misunderstood your ADD and thought that you were just “lazy, crazy, and stupid.” You may have many misconceptions that you built up over the years that you can now interpret in the light of your new understanding of ADD.

This does not in any way release you from doing the necessary work to get your life in order. Yes, you will develop insights. But you will also need to work at developing skills you have never had before.

A good therapist will teach the ADD adult to acknowledge the importance of small steps in making progress. Often people don’t continue along the road of self-improvement because they don’t acknowledge their small steps of Progress. The person with ADD often expects a difficult problem to be solved rapidly. “I want it yesterday.” If it can’t be solved soon, the person gets frustrated and gives up. The adult with ADD who learns the value of taking small but positive steps toward a goal learns a very valuable lesson. The good therapist keeps the client on track and helps the client maintain a positive perspective.

Coaches can be therapists, although coaching is not therapy. Coaches can also be another ADD adult, a friend or someone in your family. ADD coaching focuses on practical issues confronting the ADD adult, such as organization, managing time and setting and reaching goals. Coaching could help ADD adults to develop routines and daily habits which will simplify and make their lives more manageable. Some coaches are very forceful and offer lots of suggestions while others prefer coaches who mostly listen and then offer ideas.

A coaching relationship could last any length of time, but a typical relationship lasts at least six months. Sometimes coaching is done in person, one hour a week. It can be done over the phone, 10-15 minutes a day, or even done through e-mail. Hiring a trained person to be your coach is called professional coaching while getting someone else to work with you is called peer or partner coaching. Find an ADHD coach

A coach works with you to improve your results and your successes. A coach will:

  1. help you set better goals and then reach those goals
  2. ask you to do more than you would have done on your own
  3. get you to focus your efforts better to produce results more quickly
  4. provide you with the tools, support, and structure to accomplish more

How does coaching differ from consulting? …therapy? ….sports coaching? …Having a best friend?

Coaching is a form of consulting as coaches provide advice and expertise in achieving personal change and excellence. However, unlike the consultant who offers advice and leaves, a coach stays to help implement the recommended changes, making sure they really happen and ensuring that the client reaches his goals in a lasting way.

In most therapies, patients or clients work on “issues,” reflect on their past experiences and try to understand the psychodynamic causes of their behaviors. Coaching focuses only on the here and now, looking at the problems in the present needing solutions. In this way, it is like solution-focused therapy. Coaches work with their clients to gain something, such as new skills, not to lose something, such as unhealthy thought patterns. The focus is on achieving personal and professional goals that give clients the lives they want.

Professional coaching includes several principles from sports coaching, like teamwork, going for the goal, and being your best. Unlike sports coaching, professional coaching is non-competitive. You develop your own way to achieve your goals. There is not one best way to do it. It is not focused on outdoing someone else. It is focused on strengthening the client’s skills, such as a trainer might do.

Having a best friend is always wonderful, but you might not trust your best friend to advise you on the most important aspects of your life and/or business. A best friend might not be able or willing to provide the consistency in monitoring and feedback that coaching demands. The relationship with your coach has some elements of a good friendship in that a close relationship evolves. The coach knows when to be tender or tough with you, is willing to tell you the truth, and keeps your best interests foremost in the relationship.

“A coach is your partner in achieving professional goals, your champion during a turnaround, your trainer in communication and life skills, your sounding board when making choices, your motivator when strong actions are called for, your unconditional support when you take a hit, your mentor in personal development, your co-designer when developing an extraordinary project, your beacon during stormy times, your wake-up call if you don’t hear your own, and most importantly: Your coach is your partner in living the life you know you’re ready for, personally and professionally.” —Thomas Leonard, President of Coach University

People hire coaches because they want more to their life; they want to grow as individuals, and they want to make achieving their goals easier. When using a coach, people take themselves and their goals more seriously. They immediately start taking more effective and focused actions. They stop focusing on thoughts and behaviors that drag them down. They create a forward momentum to their lives and they set better goals for themselves than they would have without a coach.

COACH SELECTION RECOMMENDATIONS

Rapport is very important. Your relationship with your coach is important to your professional and personal growth. The effective coaching relationship is an effective model for all your other relationships: inspiring, supporting, challenging and productive. Choose someone you will be able to relate to very well.

Experience in your field is less important, although knowledge of A.D.D. is important. Coaching technology works for a wide variety of people, professions, and situations. A coach with experience in your personal or professional situation may understand you more quickly. However, much of your work with a coach will involve encouraging you to use and develop your personal skills and your expanding network. Therefore, the specific business experience of your coach is not as important as you might think. Coaching technology works independently of the business or professional environment.

Location is normally not important. While some coaches do offer on-site coaching, it is normally not necessary nor efficient. You will get the same or better results with telephone coaching at a fraction of your investment with on-site coaching.

Interview more than one coach before you decide. Most coaches are happy to speak with you for several minutes in order to get to know you and your situation. You can use this time as an opportunity to gather information and an impression about the coach’s style. Compare two or three coaches and select the one who seems most helpful to you. Trust yourself to know what you need.

Ask the prospective coach good questions. Great coaches are willing to answer your questions directly and forthrightly. Consider asking questions about their depth of experience, qualifications, skills, and practice. For example:

  1. “How many clients have you coached, and how many are presently active clients?”
  2. “What is your specialty and how long have you been practicing in that specialty?”
  3. “What is your knowledge of Attention Deficit Disorder? (expand this to be lots of questions–modify those suggested earlier for evaluating a mental health professional’s knowledge of ADD)”
  4. “How many clients have you had with A.D.D.?” What percentage of your clientele has this diagnosis?”
  5. “What qualifies you to coach people in my situation and how many people with my concerns have you coached?”
  6. “How do you typically work with a client?”
  7. “What are the names and numbers of some of your clients so that I may ask about your coaching?”
  8. “How long do clients usually work with you?”
  9. “What are your fees?”

RESOURCES

Find Treatment and Support for ADHD

Find an ADHD coach

 

Stage IV – Self-acceptance

Focusing on our inner values and strengths is another way to approach finding our purpose in lifeCultivating Habits of the Heart is an interesting 3-minute video.

Too often being productive is the only measure by which we judge a man. But success can come in many formsaccording to ADHD coach David Giwirec. “Who you are and your associated self-worth is not based on how well you do things…Learn how to focus on what’s important, so you don’t get emotionally hijacked by the expectations of inconsistent performance.” 

 

The inspiration for this article and some of the information on the journey, its stages, (stage IV is my addition), guides and fellow travelers came from a self-published booklet, “Coaching Partners,” by Lisa F. Poast. Material on therapy and therapists was adapted from  Do You Have Attention Deficit Disorder? by Lawrence Thomas, Ph.D. It is published by Dell Books. Information on coaching was obtained from the International Coaching Federation.

Reference – (1) The Ten Essentials Plus Four – Backpacking gear list – Harvested 10-11-2017 http://www.backpacking.net/ten-essl.html

*About the author

0 1 CynthiaHammerEarlyCynthia Hammer, MSW, ACSW, an adult with ADHD and the parent of three sons, two with ADHD. At age 49, she learned that she had ADHD and realized she knew very little about the disorder. Cynthia founded ADD Resources in 1994 and went on to become a nationally recognized advocate for the understanding of ADHD among both those who have it and those who treated it.  Cynthia is now retired and lives in Tacoma with her husband.

Original Source https://web.archive.org/web/20040207085617/http://www.addresources.org/newsletter_sample.php#journey

(Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/ FreeDigitalPhoto.net) Modified on Canva 

Treatment for ADHD and Addiction

New treatments combine medication for ADHD, drug detox and therapy.

by Trey Dyer

About 4.4 percent of American adults — 10 million people — have ADHD. And roughly 8 million children have been diagnosed with the disease, making it one the most commonly occurring mental health disorders in the United States.

 

The rate of co-occurring substance use disorders is high among those with ADHD. Individuals with this diagnosis are 2.5 times more likely to develop a substance use disorder. A study by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital found that 15 to 25 percent of adults who have a substance use disorder also have ADHD.

 

For co-occurring ADHD and substance abuse disorders, the best treatment programs combine medical treatment for ADHD, drug detox and therapy that address both disorders. Additionally, proper ADHD treatment during childhood can prevent further development of the disorder that may lead to a substance use disorder during adulthood.

 

The risk for substance abuse is often higher for people with ADHD. Compared to the general population, people with ADHD are:

  • Three times more likely to develop a nicotine use disorder
  • Two times more likely to develop an alcohol use disorder
  • Two times more likely to develop a cocaine use disorder
  • 5 times more likely to develop a marijuana use disorder

 

Research shows that those with ADHD may have lower levels of dopamine — the brain chemical responsible for reward-seeking behavior — and turn to substance abuse or other dopamine-releasing behaviors as a result.

 

Despite the increased risks, those with co-occurring ADHD and substance use disorders are not doomed to struggle with addiction their entire lives. Many rehab centers offer specialized programs for co-occurring disorders that focus on treating the separate disorders concurrently, giving patients a realistic chance of reaching recovery and living a healthy life.

Treatment for Co-Occurring ADHD and Substance Use Disorder

 

Treatment for co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders is most effective when the disorders are treated simultaneously. Addressing them at the same time is preferred to treating them one at a time, which was the generally held practice in the past.
Medication is the most common form of treatment for ADHD, and with proper use, it can greatly benefit those with co-occurring ADHD and substance use disorders. Stimulant and nonstimulant medications can be effective in treating individuals with ADHD with or without a co-occurring substance use disorder. The most common types of medications used to treat ADHD are stimulants.

Stimulant Medications

A study by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital examining the results of six long-term studies found that stimulant treatment for ADHD during youth leads to reduced risk of developing a substance use disorder during adolescence and adulthood.

 

The two most common stimulants used to treat ADHD are methylphenidate and analogs of amphetamine.

 

Amphetamine medications activate the reward pathway and trigger the release of dopamine in the brain, bringing balance to dopamine levels among those with ADHD. This can help alleviate drug cravings.

 

According to researchers at Columbia University, clinical trials of Ritalin (methylphenidate) have also been effective in reducing symptoms of ADHD and substance use disorder when combined with relapse prevention therapy. The drug has a relatively low risk of abuse under proper medical supervision.

 

Methylphenidate has been used for decades to treat ADHD and has shown to be effective for children and adults. Uncontrolled trials of methylphenidate have shown to have a positive impact in reducing symptoms of ADHD and cocaine use disorders, according to researchers at Columbia University.

 

Nonstimulant Medications

 

Some nonstimulant medications can be used to treat ADHD and may present an alternative to stimulants. While stimulants have a higher abuse potential, nonstimulants are often seen as a less effective treatment option.

 

Atomoxetine is a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor that can be used to treat ADHD. It affects those with ADHD similarly to stimulants, but in a more gradual manner. With no known abuse potential, atomoxetine is an attractive alternative to stimulant medications.
Tricyclic antidepressants have also been used to treat ADHD. However, they are generally less effective than stimulants in treating ADHD.

Problems with Medication Treatment

 

Research from Massachusetts General Hospital shows medications that are effective in treating adult ADHD may be effective for adults with ADHD and co-occurring substance use disorders, but the medical benefits of the medications are hindered if an individual is actively abusing substances.

 

Challenges of treating patients with a substance use disorder include:

 

  • Patients may not take medications reliably.
  • Patients may require higher doses in order for a medication to be effective.
  • The presence of other substances in a patient’s system may make the therapeutic effects of a medication less effective.

Individuals actively engaging in substance abuse are more difficult to treat with medication, with or without a co-occurring disorder.

 

Alcohol and ADHD Medications

 

ADHD medications are associated with high risks when used concurrently with alcohol. Adderall is a medication of particular concern because it is commonly abused by college students who participate in binge drinking culture at parties, bars and nightclubs.

Individuals who abuse Adderall and alcohol together find that the depressant alcohol effects are lessened by the stimulant properties of Adderall, allowing them to drink more for longer periods of time.

Abuse of Adderall or other ADHD medications while drinking may cause people to consume hazardous amounts of alcohol. ADHD medications that block the depressant effects of alcohol may cause individuals to ignore signals from their bodies that they have had enough to drink, which can lead to dangerous health concerns such as alcohol poisoning.

It is crucial for people to consult their doctor about alcohol use while taking any type of ADHD medication.

 

About the Author: Trey Dyer is a writer for DrugRehab.com. Trey is passionate about breaking the stigma associated with drug addiction in the United States. When Trey is not writing, he can be found fly fishing, playing soccer or cooking BBQ.

 

Sources:

 

Adler, L. et al. (2005, March). Long-term, open-label study of the safety and efficacy of atomoxetine in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: an interim analysis. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15766294

Columbia University. (n.d.). Adderall: Health risks when combined with alcohol? Retrieved from http://goaskalice.columbia.edu/answered-questions/adderall-health-risks-when-combined-alcohol

Levin, F. et al. (1998, June). Methylphenidate treatment for cocaine abusers with adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a pilot study. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9671342

Mariani, J. & Levin, F. (2007). Treatment Strategies for Co-Occurring ADHD and Substance Use Disorders. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2676785/

Michelson, D. et al. (2003, January 15). Atomoxetine in adults with ADHD: two randomized, placebo-controlled studies. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12547466

National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2010). Comorbidity: Addiction and Other Mental Illnesses. Retrieved from https://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/rrcomorbidity.pdf\

Somoza, E. (2004). An open-label pilot study of methylphenidate in the treatment of cocaine dependent patients with adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15077842

Sottile, L. (2015, October 20). The Disturbing Relationship Between Addiction and ADHD. Retrieved from http://www.vice.com/read/the-disturbing-relationship-between-addiction-and-adhd-511

Wilens, T. et al. (2003, January). Does stimulant therapy of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder beget later substance abuse? A meta-analytic review of the literature. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12509574

 

“Image courtesy of stock photos/FreeDigtalPhoto.net” Modified on Canva

&nbs

Washington State ADHD Service Providers

0 1 Washington ProvidersDisclaimer: ADD freeSources does not endorse or recommend any of the providers or services listed. Nor should not being included on the list affect your choice of provider.  We have not investigated those listed and do not have the ability to evaluate their competence in providing services to families and individuals living with ADHD.

 

 

ADHD Information and Support  

Washington State Nonprofit and State Organizations  

Adult Support groups One group still meets in Olympia.

CHADD sponsors Parent groups in Bellevue, Kirkland, Renton, University Place, and Silverdale.

Doctors, ARNPs, Psychologists & Therapists

Psychiatrists can diagnose and prescribe medications. Other MDs may or may not diagnose, but all can prescribe. Psychologists can diagnose and refer to a prescribing provider. Many Nurse Practitioners have experience adjusting ADHD medications but may not feel comfortable diagnosing.

 

Seattle, Bellevue and surrounding areas

 

Ted Mandelkorn, MD

Puget Sound Behavioral Medicine

www.psbmed.com/

Mercer island

 

David Pomeroy, MD

ADD Center of Bellevue

 

George Glade, ARNP

1800 Westlake Ave N # 303, Seattle, WA 98109

(206) 938-9580

 

Ross Mayberry, PhD

Seattle

Psychologist
Population Served: Adolescents, Adults, and Seniors

www.rossmayberryphd.com/

 

Angela Heithaus, MD

Seattle

Psychiatrist

Link works – www.drheithaus.com/

 

Alan Simons, MSN, ARNP

Bellevue
Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner
 Adults

www.allensimons.com

 

Amen Clinic Northwest  – Bellevue

http://www.amenclinics.com/

Tim Earnest, MD

Kabran Chapek, ND – Naturopathic

Treatment combines medication, supplements, and lifestyle changes. SPECT Scans are expensive and may not be covered by insurance. Will diagnose and treat without using a SPECT scan- but hourly rates are quite high and they do not accept insurance. However, if it’s a case that has been difficult to diagnose or treat, it may be worth the price.

 

Vern S. Cherewatenko, MD

www.Drvern.com

27121 174th Place SE Suite 202

Covington, WA 98042

(206)362-1111

 

Robert Brian Noonan, ARNP

Mindfulness, CBT

1405 NW 85th St Ste 4

Seattle, WA 98117 (206)452-6009

https://ballardpsych.com

 

Trina Seligman, ND – Naturopathic

Evergreen Integrative Medicine

11520 NE 20th St, Bellevue, WA 98004

(425) 646-4747

 

 

Jackson L. Haverly, M.D.

ADD ADHD Center of Seattle

753 N. 35th St. Ste. 305

Seattle, WA, 98103

(206) 286-8352

 

Russell B. Hanford, PhD

400 E Pine Street Suite 220

Seattle, WA 98122

Phone Number: (206) 409-9613

abhc.com

 

Associated Behavioral Health

Bellevue: 425-646-7279

West Seattle: 206-935-1282

North Seattle: 206-781-2661

Kent: 253-867-5344

(800) 858-6702

https://abhc.com/about-abhc/

 

 

Mary Lee McElroy, LMHC,CCDCI

Bellevue

(425) 452-9079

 

Clark T Ballard Jr MD.

9725 SE 36th St.

Mercer Island, WA 98040.

(425) 746-2124

 

Jack Reiter, MD

1404 E Yesler Way # 201

Seattle, WA 98122

(206) 328-1366

 

Hallowell Todaro Center
5502 34th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105

(206) 420-7345

http://www.hallowelltodarocenter.org/

Therapists

Lesley Todaro LMFTA, CDPT
Lynne Hakim, LICSW

Beth Dana LMFTA, CDPT

Erik Schlocker, LICSW

Marci Pliskin, LICSW

Jovana Radovic, LMFT

Psych. Testing

Melissa Huppin Korch, Ed.s

Coaches

Megan Reimann

Kathryn Korch, BA, CDP
Paul Abodeely, BA, RC

Medication

Jason Law, ARNP
Karen Boudour, ARNP

 

Divya Krishnamoorthy, M.D. Child Psychiatrist

1914 North 34th Street
Suite 401
Seattle, WA 98103
(206) 965-0030
dr.divya.krishnamoorthy@gmail.com

Maia S. Robison, M.D. Child Psychiatrist

2800 E Madison St #305, Seattle, WA 98112

(206) 328-5760

Carrie Sylvester, M.D., M.P.H. Child Psychiatrist

6100 Southcenter Blvd #300, Tukwila, WA 98188

(206) 444-7900

Douglas C. Dicharry, M.D. Child Psychiatrist
2025 112th Ave NE
Suite 200
Bellevue, WA 98004-2978
(425) 462-9511

Hower Kwon, M.D. Child Psychiatrist
365 118th Ave SE, Ste 118
Bellevue, WA 98005
(425) 454-2911
Fax: (425) 454-2966

Erika Giraldo, MN, ARNP

Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner
Population ServedChildren, Adolescents, Adults

19109 36th Ave W #209, Lynnwood, WA 98036

(206) 390-1968

 

Elizabeth MacKensie, PhD and Steven Geller, PhD 

Child & Adolescent Psychologists – Assessment, Psychotherapy, and Consultation – Population Served: Up to 21

www.west-seattle-psych.com/

Suite 202, 746 44th Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98116

(206) 932-2590

 

Andrea Kunwald, MA, LMDTA

Psychotherapy, children, adolescents, and adults

1417 NW 54th St #307, Seattle, WA 98107

(702) 401-3608

 

Kimberly Castelo, MS, LMFTA

Marriage & Family Therapist  

1836 Westlake Ave. N #303

Seattle, WA 98109 – (206) 954-9102

kimberly.castelo.llc@gmail.com

www.healingmomentscounseling.net/

 

Don Baker, LMFTA – Individual, family and relationship therapist

Therapy groups for ADHD in Seattle or online

1836 Westlake Ave N, Suite 303A

Seattle WA 98109.

www.unpackingadhd.com/

 

Cynthia Seager, MA, LMHCA

206-484-9178

cynthia@cynthiaseager.com

 

ADHD Therapy Groups in Seattle, WA
Psychology Today ADHD Groups

 

North of Seattle

 

Robert Small, MD  Psychiatrist

7001 220th St SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043

(425) 918-4573

 

Eastside Psychological Associates

Independent Practitioners – Eastside and greater Seattle area.  Offices in Issaquah, Snoqualmie, and Woodinville. Everett Clinic – Search under behavioral health brought up over 25 providers north of Seattle. The referral line is 425-458-5048. info@eastsidepsychologicalassociates.com

 

 

Tacoma

Rainier Associates

George  F. Jackson III,  MD –

James Dale Howard, MD

(Fletcher Taylor, MD is very experienced, but seldom has an opening)

Steve Parkinson, PhD also does ADHD Assessments

Trust the front desk, but be clear about what you need.

5909 Orchard St W

University Place, WA  98467

(253) 475-6021

 

Robert Sands, MD (& Associates)

Child Psychiatrists- will work with adults)

Bellmore Center

3609 S 19th St

Tacoma, WA 98408

253-752-6056

 

Dr. Stephen Schilt, MD- (Child Psychiatrist)

7609 6th Ave

Tacoma, WA 98405

 

Union Ave. Neurobehavioral Clinic

Child Psychiatrists- Will also diagnose and treat parents of the children they treat)

Carl Plonsky and Associates

Dr. Heather Daniels and others

1530 S. Union Suite 13

Tacoma, WA 98405

(253)759-5340

 

Lance A. Harris, PhD – Neuropsychologist

3001 East J Street

Tacoma, WA 98404

Phone: 253) 274-9733

 

Edwin Lawrence Hill, PhD – Neuropsychologist

2013 South 19th Street

Tacoma, WA 98405

Phone: (253) 383-3355

 

Daniel Wanwig, MD – Adult psychiatrist

1901 South Union Avenue Suite A305

Tacoma, WA 98405

Phone: (253) 272-3031

 

Patrick Joseph Donnely. MD – Adult psychiatrist
3609 South 19th Street

Tacoma, WA 98405

Phone: (253) 381-3071

 

Robert Grumer, DO, Ann Marie Branchard, MD and Todd Clemens, MD

Tacoma Behavioral Health Svs – Group Health

4301 South Pine Street Suite 301
Tacoma, WA98409

(253) 476-6500

 

Penny Tanner, ARNP

7424 Bridgeport Way W Ste 302

(253) 581-6106

Deborah Brown, ARNP

Fircrest area (253) 565-1678

 

Robert Kopec, ARNP

4009 Bridgeport Way SW Ste. A

University Place, WA 98466

(253) 503-6761

http://www.pugetmentalcare.com/

 

Allenmore Psychological Associates, PS

10 Psychologists, 1 prescribing ARNP

New address – Please telephone

(253) 752-7320

Tacoma, WA

Website: https://www.allenmorecounseling.com (Link works)

 

Paul DeBusschere, MD FAAP

Belinda Rowe, MD and John Hautala, MD. FAAP

http://www.universityplacepediatrics.com

1033 Regents Blvd, Fircrest

253-565-1115

 

Advanced Behavioral Medicine & Neuropsychology Associates, Inc.

Edwin Hill, PhD, ABDA (Associates- Donna Lidren, PhD; Kathy Brzezinski-Stein, PhD; Barbara Dahl, PhD)

(253) 383-3355   Fax:   (253) 383-3627

Email:   foredhill@msn.com

2013 South 19th Street

Tacoma , WA    98405

 

William Melany, M.A., LMFT, LMHC

(206) 903-9506  Fax:   (253) 759-7129

wmeleney2@earthlink.net

3609 S. 19th St.  – Tacoma, WA     98405

 

CLINICS

Comprehensive Life Resources Adults and Children

http://comprehensiveliferesources.org/

Individual and family counseling, Case management, Group Therapy, Psychiatric services and medication management. Partners with Tacoma schools to offer counseling at schools, Services also available in Gig Harbor.

Must call for information 253-396-5800

1305 Tacoma Ave S Ste 305
Tacoma, WA 98402
(253) 396-5000

 

 

 

Olympia

 

John Holtum. MD – Behavioral Health Research

4422 6th Ave SE

Lacy, WA 98503

360-403-4437

David Penner MD PLLC
324 West Bay Dr NW
STE 214
Olympia, Washington 98502
(360) 339-8759

Laura Wagner, ARNP

Sound Psychiatric Solutions, LLC
1800 Cooper Point Road SW
Building 12
Olympia, Washington 98502
(360) 633-2819

Edward Case, MD

200 Lilly Road NE, Suite B-3
Olympia, Washington 98506

 

 

Gig Harbor

 

 

Michael R. Pearson, MD Psychiatrist

5801 Soundview Dr # 251, Gig Harbor, WA 98335

(253) 858-3464

 

Dr. Vanraj C. VaruPsychiatrist
7191 Wagner Way NW – Gig Harbor, WA 98335
(253) 514-8076

 

Munn, Helen, ARNP

4700 Point Fosdick Dr NW Ste 302
Gig Harbor, WA   98335
(253) 851-3808

 

Brace, Melanie, ARNP

6401 Kimball Dr. Ste. 104
Gig Harbor, WA   98335
(253) 853-3888

 

Sara J. Weelborg, ARNP

http://www.saraweelborg.com/

6625 Wagner Way, NE Ste 250

Gig Harbor, WA 98335

360-516-0068

 

Brian O’Connor – Therapist

boconnor@harborwellbeing.com

4700 Point Fosdick Dr. NW #302, Gig Harbor, WA 98335

(253) 851-3808

 

 

Peninsula

Peninsula Psychological Center

4 locations- Silverdale, Poulsbo, Bainbridge Island and Port Orchard

http://www.kitsapcounselor.com/

W. Steven Hutton, M.D.
Pediatrician
1100 Basich Blvd, Aberdeen, WA 98520
(360) 532-1950

 

Puyallup

 

Penlaver and Associates

319 9th Street NW

Puyallup, WA 98371

253-848-0351

 

Woodcreek Behavioral Health

1706 S Meridian # 120

Puyallup, WA 98371

 

 

 

Woodcreek Pediatrics

11102 Sunrise Blvd East

Puyallup, WA 98374

253- 848-8797

 

 

 

Spokane

 

Hi Young Lee, MD  – Family physician

17 E Empire Ave

(509)328-3430

 

Mira G, Narkiewicz, MD – Psychiatrist

140 South Arthur St. Suite 690

Spokane, WA

(509) 462-4567

 

 

Coaches

 

Margit Crane Luria aka Yafa Luria Parent and teen coach –

http:// Margit Crane.com – Blocked to Brilliant – Copy and paste URL

blockedtobrilliant@yahoo.com

555 116th Avenue NE

Suite 242

Bellevue, WA. 98004

Online classes and coaching – Free presentations for PTAs and sometimes other venues

 

Amy Voros

amy@creativecatapultcoach.com

2226 Eastlake AVE E, #135 Seattle, Washington 98102

(Adults, teens and college students)

 

Pete Terlaak

www.coachforfreedom.com – Copy and paste URL

 

Viveca Monahan

http://coachviv.com/

viv@coachviv.com

 

Mimi Handlin, MSW

ADD Family Coaching- Adults, college students, and teens

http://addfamilycoaching.com/

 

Hope Sandler Russell

(Seattle) Group coaching (206) 499-9595 –

hope.sandler@gmail.com –

http://www.coachingadd.net

 

Hallowell Todaro Center

http://www.hallowelltodarocenter.org/

Coaches

Megan Reimann

Kathryn Korch, BA, CDP
Paul Abodeely, BA, RC

5502 34th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105

(206) 420-7345

 

 

Organizers

 

Denise Allan, CPO, CPO-CD

simplifyexperts.com/

8917 NE 198th St, Bothell, WA 98011

(425) 770-5759

 

Steve’s Organizing LLC

5016 74th Street Court East  Tacoma, WA 98443
(253) 229-1237

www.stevesorganizing.com/

 

Cindy Jobs

Serving Puget Sound and Kittitas County

(206) 707-3458 or (509) 674-6643

cindy@organizetosimplify.com

 

Empty your Nest

Bainbridge Island, North Kitsap Cty.

(206) 818-6472

https://www.facebook.com/emptyyournest/

 

 

 

Advocates, Tutors, Schools & Speakers

 

Larry Davis – Special Education advocate – Author

The Insiders Guide to Special Education Advocacy: Taking the Path Toward Successful IEP & 504 Advocacy 2nd Edition $20)

Love, Understanding, and Other Best Practices: The New School of Thought on IEP & 504 Plans Kindle Edition ($12)

Barbara Bennett, MA

Educational Therapist/Educational Consultant/ADHD Coach
Population Served: Age 4 – Adult

www.barbara-bennett.com/

 

Kendra Wagner

Tutor, researcher, and teacher of teachers. She advocates for children and parents in and out of the school system. She teaches all ages all aspects of literacy and specializes in Dyslexia and ADD. http://www.readingwritingthinking.net/

(206) 947-4478 kendra9@mindspring.com

 

Margit Crane Luria – Parent and teen coach –

Blocked to Brilliant.com – ADHD Unlimited – Stuck but Brilliant

 

Online classes and coaching – Free presentations for PTAs and sometimes other venues

 

New Horizon School – Renton

For students with Learning Disabilities, Attention difficulties and Autism Spectrum disorders – 4th-12th grade

http://www.new-horizon-school.org/

 

Yellow Wood Academy

9655 SE 36th St #101, Mercer Island, WA 98040

http://www.yellowwoodacademy.org/

(206) 236-1095

 

Dartmoor School

http://www.dartmoorschool.org/ 

If link is broken, copy and paste: https://dartmoorschool.org/

(425) 503-9847


Schools for learning disabilities in the Seattle area 
– Try a Google Search.

Private Schools with Programs or Assistance for LD and ADD – From the Learning Disabilities of  Washington LD and ADHD Directory

 

 

 

Search Engines

The Learning Disability Association of Washington online directory helps those affected by learning disabilities find resources within the greater Puget Sound region. The directory lists over 800 resources organized into categories ranging from diagnostic testing, consultants, therapists and support groups to optometrists, ADHD resources, physicians, and psychiatrists.

Psychiatric Nurse PractitionersAssociation of Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurses – A simple search provides the most results. (Being updated. Offline until August 15, 2016.)

Washington State ADHD Treatment Providers – Note: ADD freeSources does not endorse or recommend any provider or services listed. Nor should exclusion from the listing affect your choice of provider. Many of these were chosen because they were associated with ADD Resources or local CHADD groups at some time.

 

CHADD Resource Directory

ADHD Professional Services, Parent to Parent Teachers, Tutors, Schools and Support groups

 

Psychology Today Look for Find a Therapist page on Menu – Find Therapists, Psychiatrists, and therapy groups.

Our Find ADHD Treatment and Support  page has a fine collection of Directories to help you find a myriad of services you may need to treat ADHD – It includes:

Find Support
ADHD Directories
Professional Medical Directories
Professional Medical directories with ADHD search option
Questions to help find the right Providers

Supplemental Treatment Providers for ADHD – ADHD Coaches, Professional Organizers, Support groups, Lawyers, Educational Consultants, Advocates, Information and Parent support organizations, Private Schools, Tutors,  and Residential Treatment Facilities.
ADHD Treatment: Money Matters
Who can Diagnose?
Diagnosis and Treatment concerns

Additional Advice on Finding Mental Health services

 

“Photo Courtesy of Tuomas_Lehtinen/ FreeDigitalPhoto.com” Modified on Canva

 

 

Maintaining the ADHD Brain

 

If your brain sputters take it to a doctor for a checkup.I want to change my ADHD Life, What can I do?

Life Styles for ADHD

Maintaining the ADHD Brain

ADHD Coaching Strategies

Celebrating ADHD

 

Maintaining the ADHD Brain

Diagnoses

The core symptoms of ADHD are hyperactivity, impulsiveness, distractibility and inattention as evidenced by problems organizing, planning, procrastinating, and time management. But doesn’t everybody have these problems? Yes, but for the diagnosis to be applicable, the doctor will consider the severity and duration and the extent to which your problems interfere with the quality of your life. For a diagnosis, you must see a doctor who is knowledgeable in ADHD and related problems. The principle tool for diagnosis is the interview.

Before seeing your doctor, take some quiet time to think about what is really bothering you and write it down. (People with AD/HD often forget the key things to say). If your office looks like the aftermath of a hurricane and you feel depressed, be sure to tell the doctor both facts. You may be depressed because you can’t deal with the office, or your office may be a disaster because you are depressed. Which came first?

Medication

“Pills? I don’t take pills!”

Well, you aren’t alone. Many people feel that way. Consider for a moment. Do the pills make you a different person? Is it not you, if you take a pill? Who is the real you?

  • That person who loses his temper at the slightest excuse,
  • the nerd who walks past his best friend without saying “Hello”,
  • the wife who is too tired to clean up the mess and greet hubby with a smile and kiss when he comes home?

Or are you the smiling affable, competent person you know is inside trying to get out?

Let’s go back to our car. Do you expect your car to run without oil or gasoline? Would you drive a car that worked on two or three of its four cylinders? Your brain needs fuel.

Ideally, every brain would produce just the right amount of all the ingredients it needs, but there is no such thing as an ideal brain. Some brains are chronically undersupplied with the chemicals they need to function properly. Clinical trials have shown that medication is the most effective method of dealing with an under functioning brain

There are a number of medications available. Your doctor may need to try more than one, to find the right one for you. He will probably start with a low dose to see if you tolerate it and then increase the dose to find the most effective dosage and timing. So don’t be discouraged if you don’t get a positive result immediately.

When you start taking the medication it would be a good idea to keep a record of the time you take it and any sensations you may feel and the time when they occur. Be sure to tell your doctor about all the effects. Some unpleasant effects like a headache or dizziness may, in fact, be what are called rebound effects which occur when the medication wears off. The problem can often be resolved by changing the timing of the next dose or even by increasing the dosage. Help your doctor to know what’s happening and he can help you to find the best solution for you.

For information about medication, you must see a doctor who has experience with ADHD.

For treatment guidelines and which medications are available, see

A PHYSICIAN’S PERSPECTIVE on ADHD Medications by Theodore Mandelkorn, MD

Editor’s note: Not everyone wants to take medication or is helped by traditional ADHD medications. Nor is medication alone enough. Some type of outside intervention, however, is usually helpful.  You may prefer to try cognitive behavior therapy, coaching, diet changes, supplements, mindfulness meditation or any number of holistic or alternative treatments. Many treat their ADHD with a combination of these, searching for the right mix.  Please see the Pinterest boards listed below for examples.

 

Published by Sarah Jane Keyser, Copyright 2006, all rights reserved. Coaching Key to ADD

 

 

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If you’re not on Pinterest, you can access 50 of ADD freeSources’ Boards on Facebook. Look for the Pinterest tab on the left.

Follow ADHD / ADD freeSources’ board Diagnosis and Treatment of ADHD on Pinterest.Follow ADHD / ADD freeSources’ board Medications – a valid option for treating ADHD on Pinterest.

Follow ADHD / ADD freeSources’ board Holistic Treatment Strategies for ADHD on Pinterest.

ADHD Video Presentations: 3 Minutes to 1 Hour

0 Video Presentations by ADHD Experts

 

ADHD Experts Speak.

Watch and learn. 

 

 

 

Dr. Russell Barkley on ADHD Meds and how they all work differently (7-minutes)

This is How you Treat ADHD based on Science – Russell Barkley, Ph.D. – 13-minute clip with powerpoint plus access to the entire 2 1/2-hour lecture for the 2012 Burnett Lecture series at Chapel Hill University

Understanding Emotions & Motivations in High School and College Students with ADHD/LDWith Dr. Thomas E. Brown for the 13th Annual Timothy B. and Jane A Burnett Seminar for Academic Achievement (2014) Parts 1, 2 and 3 with Q&A

CADDAC Conference ina BoxCan’t attend an ADHD conference? You can still learn about ADHD from experts in the field. Best of all, you can view them on your own time and for no charge.

*Best of the Web –2009 and 2010 CADDAC Conferences videos- Look under Educational videos to choose the clips that are most applicable to your needs. A wonderful gift from – The Centre for ADD/ADHD Advocacy of Canada- (CADDAC) Choose from a number of presentations filmed over both days.

The 30 Essential Ideas Every Parent Needs to Know (about ADHD),  by Dr. Russell Barkley
This is the 3-hour video presentation from the CADDAC conference (found above), broken up into 27 manageable parts with an average length of 6 to 7 minutes.  It’s  far easier to watch.  To take a saying from Barkley, “Small Chunks, Frequent Breaks.”

ADHD Neurology and Genetic Research 6 short videos with Professor Philip Shaw from NIH (National Institute of Health) DNA Learning center series – Makes difficult concepts more readily understandable.

You, Me and Adult ADD with Gina Pera – 7clips containing Gina’s talk for CADDRA’s 2009 Conference. Find on ADHD Rollercoaster’sYouTube Channel

Classroom Interventions for ADHD Video with Russell Barkley (3 ½ minutes)

TedTalks on ADHD

ADHD: Undiagnosed in Millions, Do You Have it? (4 minutes) Alan Brown gives us a call to action to be advocates to bring awareness and attention to ADHD so individuals do not fall through the cracks and have the safety net they need to succeed.

Dr. Russell Barkley’s Continuing Education Courses and Videos 35 hours of lectures on ADHD at ADHDLectures.coms. Available for Free viewing in Spanish.

Dr. Charles Parker’s ADHD Medication Tutorials (Link works) 8 short videos by Dr. Charles Parker – about a ½ hour in total – Matching Article: Finding the Therapeutic Window *TOP tips – Open a regular dialogue with your patients and measure the effectiveness of the medications. See his YouTube channel (Link works)

 

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Find an ADD coach / ADD Coach Training

Find an ADD Coach
ADD coaching focuses on practical issues confronting the ADD adult, such as organization, managing time, and setting and reaching goals. ADHD Coaches can be therapists, although coaching is not therapy. Alex Hey writes, “An ADHD coach is able to look at the life circumstances of someone with ADHD and how ADHD is at work in their life. By knowing more about their own uniquely wired brain, the coaching client is better able to design action plans that will work for them. This is why it is important to find an ADHD coach who has training in ADHD.”

See The ADD Journey: Help for the Road Ahead or ADHD Coaching Strategies to learn more about ADHD Coaches and how their services differ from those offered by other treatment providers. For even more information, Totally ADD! has created 6 short videos titled “What is ADHD Coaching?

If you cannot afford a personal coach,  see ADHD Coaching Options which lists group coaching, self-coaching, and other options.

Search Tips – Most ADD coaches work over the phone. It’s possible that you won’t find one nearby. It may be more important to find one who deals with your specific needs rather than one close to you. With any site, just choose Coach as the Service Provider Type and the Age Group looking for help. To narrow the search further, make a selection from Coaching Focus. If you prefer someone nearby, your choices will be much more restricted.

Any ADHD Provider Directory will have a number of listings for Coaches.

You’ll find other listings through AD/HD Coach Certification or Training Programs.

You can also find a few referrals for Specialty Coaching for Teens and Parent below. 
AD/HD Coach Certification

The specialized field of ADD Coaching is still largely unregulated. No certification past that granted by the following organizations is required to call yourself an ADD Coach. Most of the Associations seeking to establish standards for ADD Coaching require applicants to have met the training requirements for Life Coaching set up by the International Coach Federation (ICF), International Association of Coaching (IAC), or the ADD Coach Academy (ADDCA)  with David Giwerc.

On the other hand, there are now ADHD Coaching Associations and specific ADHD Coach Training that credit specialized training in working with clients with ADHD.

The Professional Association of ADHD Coaches seeks to advance the field of AD/HD Coaching through the development and delivery of a professional credentialing standard for AD/HD Coaches worldwide. (No training available- instead they rate a coach’s experience and training to ascertain what ranking they should receive.) PAAC Certification requirements


ADHD Coach Training

The ADHD Coaches Organization (ACO)
ACO posts a number of Coach Training opportunities.
They also have a coach referral service. (Site under construction as of March 2019) It lists 150 life coaches who have additional training in ADHD.

ADD Coach Academy (ADDCA – with David Giwerc)
Provides coaching accreditation through ICF plus training for ADHD  – Site includes a Coaches Directory

American Coaching Association

ADD in the Spirit ADD Coach Training with Peggy Romundo and Madeline Griffith-Haynie.

Sandy Maynard of Catalytic Coaching offers Individual Coach Training

As does Susan Sussman and Laurie Dupar’s International ADHD Coach Training Institute. 

Additional Coach Training to work with Children and Teens with ADHD

Edge Foundation – Provides coaching for teens and college students as well as ADD coach training to certified life coaches. Find a coach for your teen here. Look at the top bar to find  coaches for your student or yourself.

 

Specialty Coaching for Teens and Parents

Edge Foundation – Provides coaching for teens and college students as well as ADD coach training to certified life coaches.

Parent coaching or groups – Online or phone-based.  Options vary from free services, like blogs and Facebook groups, to webinars, online or recorded classes to participatory groups and individual Parent coaching.  See our collection at  Parent Training Providers

 

 

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Lower Prescription Medication Costs

Medication Enter Key- renjith krishnan-FDP

Articles – Patient Assistance Programs

Best Buys on ADHD Stimulant Medications – (According to Consumer Reports)

Insider tips on lowering ADHD costs (Link works) by getting your insurance company to pay for medication, treatment, and other therapies by Jane Lehto

Reduce ADHD Costs with Patient Assistant Programs by Kimberly Holland
Find retail prices for the brand name and generic versions of Adderall and other popular ADHD medications. (Be sure to compare costs with your local pharmacies.) Try other cost-saving techniques, such as mail-order prescriptions and coupons.

A comprehensive collection of sources for help with medication costs – Post on Psych Central Forums. (Link works) – Repeats some of the sources listed below but provides additional ideas especially about generic medications. (URL: https://psychcentralforums.com/insurance-and-finances/153805-free-low-price-prescriptions.html#post1481620)

Help from Pharmaceutical Companies – Patient Assistance Programs

Eligibility varies program by program. Generally, individuals must have incomes under 200% of the Federal Poverty Level, cannot have prescription coverage from any public or private source and must be a U.S. resident or citizen. Some companies also require that the patient has no health insurance (including Medicare).

Note: These are non-profit sites and do not charge you for their help.

RX Hope has program descriptions and downloadable applications for prescription assistance programs for specific medications including psychotropic medications

Needy Meds – Just enter the name of your medication in the Drug Search box in the upper right corner.

RxAssist – Offers access to PHARMA programs for both doctors and consumers (877) 844-8442

Note: IF you need Vyvanse or Intuniv, Shire Care’s income criteria is significantly higher than the less than the 2x the poverty level required by most Pharma programs. You still need to provide proof of hardship however. Each application will be considered on a case by case basis. See Shire Care for more information and to apply.

Monthly paperwork for stimulant medications too much for you to deal with?
For a small fee, The Medicine Program.com will help you with applying for PHARMA programs and enlisting your physician’s help. – P.O. Box 520 – Doniphan, MO 63935-0520 – (573) 996-7300

Return to: ADHD Treatment: Money Matters

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