Category Archives: Audio and Video

Meet ADHD Challenges with Acceptance and Connection

Accepting Life with ADHD: August 2017 Newsletter

 

Thrive with ADHD through self-acceptance.We are lucky to have two posts this month from guest author Elizabeth Lewis, founder of  A Dose of Healthy Distraction. We’ll expand on her work with a  focus the on how it feels to have ADHD and the power of self- acceptance in finding new ways to meet the challenges of ADHD.

I struggle with feeling worthy, like I am ENOUGH, just as I am. (That I’m doing pretty well. …considering everything…most of the time.)  I suspect that I am not alone in feeling this way.

But, I AM getting better and feeling more comfortable in my own skin.  I’ve been blessed by many people who reassure me, who see and nurture my gifts with love. Support groups, coaches, and group coaching members have been a great help as well.  

As you enjoy the final days of summer, consider this FREE 12-week self-coaching program that ADHD coach Linda Walker is leading again this year.  Short videos introduce each segment with a simple assignment for the week. These help you develop small habits to build routines for accomplishing both daily tasks and larger projects. I had great results following the steps last year. Try it out!

How does it feel to have ADHD?

And what can we do about it?

 

Elizabeth Lewis delves into the emotions many people with ADHD deal with in Against the Wind: How it Feels to be a Woman with ADHD.  Liz writes, “It seems like we are forgetful or careless. Sometimes we come off as self-centered or even lazy. But you are not lazy or unmotivated. And you are not self-centered.”

“ADHD is frustrating and infuriating. A lifetime of criticism, from our self and others, really takes its toll.” Woman and girls have traditionally been under diagnosed and feel overwhelmed by combined roles of working, homemaking and caretaking.  But, man, woman or child all report the frustration, racing thoughts, mental exhaustion, and irritability that Liz describes. These feelings reflect problems with managing well at home, school, in the workplace and socially. Because of these feelings of failure, individuals with ADHD often judge themselves unfavorably.

Shame and Acceptance

 

All too often children and adult with ADHD “view themselves as fundamentally different and flawed.” William Dodson, M.D. writes on this encompassing feeling and how to overcome its hold on us for ADDitude Magazine in When the Shame of Living with a Disorder Is Worse Than the Disorder Itself.” He points out thatFeeling shame is different from feeling guilt. Guilt focuses on what is done. Shame focuses on who one is.

But, “What if you loved yourself, laziness and all? What if you loved yourself, all that is ugly and incompetent and mean, along with the beauty and brilliance and kindness?” In Unconditional Acceptance of Yourself, Leo Babauta of Zen Habits talks about this radical change. Acceptance does not mean you cannot make improvements in your life, Leo says, “Acceptance isn’t stagnation — you will change no matter what. You can’t avoid changing. The question is whether that change comes from a place of acceptance and love, or a place of self-dislike and dissatisfaction.”

For good examples of how this acceptance leads to successful change and self-advocacy, see  “Know your Brain” (Link works) by Psych Central’s  “ADHD Millennial” blogger Neil Peterson. He explains, “The key to making progress on managing my ADHD was the shift from trying to change internal things that I can’t control to changing external things that I can control… In other words,  shifting from trying to change my brain to accepting my brain and trying to change my environment.”

Dr. William Dodson in Secrets of the ADHD Brain explains that with the ADHD brain, interest, a challenge, novelty, urgency or a strong sense of purpose help spur action We can develop routines for most mundane tasks but, we usually need an extra boost for projects. Medication helps with many symptoms, but you will need additional supports to manage your life well. Rather than focus on remedying areas where you struggle, you need to use your specific tools that get you “in the zone” and help you start each morning feeling motivated and capable.

What do you need to do to turn your brain on? How can you put your knowledge to work for you to adapt your life and environment?

 

See our Pinterest Boards for many more ideas on coming to accept your brain and how it works at its best: What’s Getting in Your Way,   Lead with your Strengths,  and Self-advocacy. If you’re not on Pinterest, you can access the boards through ADD freeSources on Facebook.  Look for the Pinterest section on the menu.

 

Acceptance for Parents

Acceptance of their child’s diagnosis and meeting their needs is vital for parents as well.

In How to Accept your Child’s Diagnosis: Even When it Hurts, Elizabeth Lewis reveals her ongoing process.  First and foremost, remember to enjoy your child. Love them, and seek to understand their differences – both their talents and challenges. You’ll also need to take personal time, grieve, and modify your vision for the future. Be ready to support and advocate for your child and teach them to ask for help to meet their own needs.

Liz admits that “I am scared and I am sad. But I know I am not alone.  A diagnosis gives you the chance to learn and grow and provide the resources your child needs.”

 

The Awesomeness of Accepting our Children’s Diagnosis (Link works) by Penny Williams, blogger and parenting coach of Parenting ADHD and Autism, expands on this concept. Penny shares her insight learned through years of struggle. “I was allowing ADHD to be a barrier to success and joy by fixating on making it better.”

But, “There is no “fixing” ADHD. There’s no cure. Nothing will erase its symptoms. When I realized that I couldn’t’ make ADHD better, but I could make life with ADHD better, things took a drastic, positive turn forward. Our job is to make life better, not to make the disability better.”

Podcast and Videos

 

One person who found a way to thrive with ADHD through self-acceptance is ADHD advocate and educator Jessica McCabe, founder of the popular YouTube Channel How to ADHD.  ADHD pioneer Ned Hallowell interviews Jessica about how working with a coach helped her define her strengths and driving purpose. Listen to the Distraction Podcast: Jessica McCabe tells us How to ADHD. Link works. (20-minutes)  Together with her fiancée/producer Edward, Jessica has developed a unique service that now has over 100,000 subscribers.  Her friendly, “Hello brains!” invites viewers to enjoy her informative videos. You might also enjoy Jessica’s interviews with Hallowell.

 

Always remember that you are not alone. You need validation and connection. FIND your TRIBE!.

To provide a realistic yet positive community for women with ADHD, this month’s guest author Liz Lewis founded A Dose of Healthy Distraction, a website and a private Facebook group.

The Find Support for ADHD section lists a number of in online and in-person ADHD support groups to meet a wide variety of needs.

 

Understanding ADHD from a personal perspective will be the focus next month. You’ll find strategies for parenting with empathy, and tips for organizing and managing your life more effectively.

Until then,

Joan Jager

ADD freeSources.net

(Photo courtesy of Vlado/ FreeDigitalPhoto.net) Modified on Canva.com

ADD freeSources News – May 30, 2017

Welcome. Thanks for inviting me into your inbox. I’m new to having more than a few subscribers, so please bear with me as I try to figure out what you might be most interested in.

If you’re the parent of a child with ADHD, I have a collection of online articles, websites, activities, and videos that your kids might like. It’s been popular in Parent groups on Facebook this week.  See my Kids ADHD Page – Things to read, do and watch.

When you think about ADHD, the controversy about prescribing stimulant medications is paramount in most people’s minds. The decision to medicate is intensely personal and not an easy choice to make. Dr. Ted Mandelkorn graciously let me re-post an extensive article that will increase your knowledge: A PHYSICIAN’S PERSPECTIVE on ADHD Medications – Therapeutic Treatment of ADHD.  Also, Gina Pera wrote a great article this month for ADDitude on 10 Medication Fallacies even Doctors Believe. 

I like Why I Chose to Medicate my Child by Dianne Dempster about how a family that eats organic and prefers holistic treatments for illness came to the decision to try ADHD medication for their son.  “I knew that I could always have my son stop taking the medication; but, if he never tried it, I wouldn’t really know if it would help him or not…Ultimately everything comes back to my son.” If you’re considering a stopping medication over the summer break, ADDitude magazine has an article weighing the pros and cons of medication holidays.

For myself, as an adult with bipolar disorder and ADHD, one of my biggest challenges with the greatest reward has been coming to believe and trust in myself. “For many of us, with ADHD or not, there’s an underlying feeling of not being good enough, wanting to be better, wanting to be in better shape or better at things.” Unconditional Acceptance of Yourself by Leo Babauta of Zen Habits addresses that pain, helping to repair that feeling of being unworthy.

Getting the word out on feeling better about having  ADHD, Kari Hogan of ADDing to the Mayhem shared 16 Steps to Better Self-Esteem with ADHD that details many non-medical treatments that will improve your daily functioning and make you feel more confident in yourself and more in control of your life..  (These ideas work for kids and teens as well.)

  • “Your first step is STRUCTURE.
    By creating structure, each day, you’re giving yourself a reason to wake up and get out of bed!
  • The second step echoes the first step. Set up a daily to-do list. This will give you a sense of accomplishment (it gives you a reason to be proud of yourself).
  • Step 3. FOCUS on your good qualities…”

 

I have the feeling that this is just TOO much information but hope you will find something that meets your needs.

Joan Jager
ADD freeSources.net

Follow ADD freeSources on Pinterest or Facebook.

Neuropathology and Genetics of ADHD – 6 Part Video Series

Neuropathology and Genetics of ADHD – DNA Learning Center videos with Professor Phillip Shaw (1 to 2-minutes each)

Neuropathology of ADHD  – Three brain areas in relation to the neuropathology of ADHD: the frontal cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus.

Neuropathology of Attention  – Research indicates a pattern of right-hemisphere dominance for attention in the mature brain.

Adult ADHD – Persistence and Remission  – “Research suggests 20-25% of children with ADHD have a severe adult form, while approximately 33% show complete remission.” –  “In youth with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the brain matures in a normal pattern but is delayed three years in some regions, on average, compared to youth without the disorder, an imaging study reveals. The delay in ADHD was most prominent in regions at the front of the brain’s outer mantle (cortex), important for the ability to control thinking, attention and planning. (Executive Functions) (1)

ADHD Comorbidity  – “Similarities between ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder. The boundary between these disorders is somewhat unclear.”

ADHD, DRD4, and Brain Development  – “Research links ADHD with a variant of the Dopamine RD4 gene, which is also associated with brain development.

Biochemistry of ADHD – Dopamine  – “An association between ADHD and dopamine receptors may relate to brain development.”

(1) Brain Matures a Few Years Late in ADHD, but Follows a Normal Pattern

NIH News Release- Monday, November 12, 2007

ttps://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/brain-matures-few-years-late-adhd-follows-normal-pattern

ADD Resources Directors and Staff

0 1 CynthiaHammerEarlyDirector Cynthia Hammer (2002 -December 2007)

Volunteer –  Julianne Owen (2002 – 2003)

Aide- Joan Riley Jager (2002 –  2007)

 

Director Francine Lawrence (2008)

Administrative Assistant – Kathy Engle

Intern – Laura Del Ragno

 

0 1 kathy-engle-website-130x130Director Kathy Engle (2009 – March 2012)

Support Staff – Brandon Koch (2010 – 2014)

Office and Website Volunteer – Joan Riley Jager (2010 to 2013)

 

Interim Director Steve Curry (March 2012 – January 2013)

Staff – Technical Support and Co-ordinator –  Brandon Koch

Volunteer Joan Riley Jager

 

Laura Del Ragno – (January – June 2013)

Brandon Koch

Joan Jager (Until March of 2013)

 

Interim Staff – June 2013 – November 2013

Janice Tharp Office manager

Brandon Koch

 

0 1 MegMcDonald1Director Meagan McDonald –  (November 2013 – November 2015)

Chris Norman, Volunteer

Jill Murphy, Volunteer

 

 

 

 

 

Early Supporters

0 1 Our ThanksI wish I could thank every donor for their interest and support. We couldn’t have survived without anyone of you. Here are just a few examples of the many ways that leaders in the field of ADHD contributed to our efforts.

Drs. Ned Hallowell and John Ratey were early supporters, contributing articles for the Adult ADD Reader that helped fund the organization. Hallowell gave numerous talks in the early years, including a Training Seminar for Professionals and was our first main Conference presenter. Perhaps, your first connection with ADD Resources was talking with Cynthia at home or later calling the office for help after seeing the phone number listed in the Resource section at the back of their classic book,  Driven to Distraction.

We could always count on Daniel Amen, of Healing ADD and PBS fame, to attract a crowd. He often donated his time when presenting for us and once contributed a free ADHD evaluation, complete with SPECT Brain Scans, to a fundraising raffle. Did you enter to win? Ted Mandelkorn, M.D. from Mercer Island was also a wonderful friend. Always generous, he wrote an extensive article on ADHD medication, presented at the first Parent and Teacher Workshops and every conference thereafter for gratis. David Pomeroy, M.D. not only presented, he also served on the Board for two terms. Therapist Don Baker and ADHD coach Pete Terlaak both led the Seattle support group at different times as well as serving as Board president.  (Pete Terlaak – http://coachforfreedom.com/)

Non-profit organizations depend on the kindness of friends and strangers. You could list services for free in Our National ADHD Provider Directory, but many chose to contribute through Professional membership. In time, we built a group of loyal members who provided a solid funding base, but other donations also helped provide services we wanted to offer. Many authors sent us a number of their books to contribute to our growing Lending Library. Sam Goldstein sent us copies of his documentary on Resilience DVDs after presenting at a conference.

Sandra Reif donated enough training DVDs and other material to provide every Teacher a bonus packet worth more than their cost to attend the workshop. Chris Zeigler-Dendy made her great “ADHD is the Tip of the Iceberg” posters available at cost, so we could send them out to schools to post in the teachers’ lounge. Sari Solden came to lead our intimate Women’s Retreat in 2004 and gave a public talk the night before as well. William W. Dodson, M.D. arranged to have his speaking fee covered after realizing how tight our budget was. These are a just a few examples of how strangers united in service became a positive force in spreading ADHD awareness. Please help support those ADHD nonprofits who still serve the public so well.

 

Note: We couldn’t have succeeded without the support of local ADHD professionals. We depended on them both to promote our organization and to present for support groups, a workshop or at a conference.  A large number also supported our work through membership. Many of the providers listed in this informal collection Washington State ADHD Treatment Providers were chosen because of their involvement with ADD Resources or CHADD affiliates.

ADD Resources Board Members

0 1 Board

Always good to see you again. Now, let’s get work.

Our board members have been some of our most important volunteers. Board members play an important role in the governance of a nonprofit. Serving without compensation, they determine the Mission and Vision of the organization and plan how to best provide the services that further those aims. “Rather than steer the boat by managing day-to-day operations, board members provide foresight, oversight, and insight.” (1)They also work to ensure the financial stability of the organization by raising funds and providing careful stewardship.

In other words, it involves a lot of boring meetings, careful planning, following strict rules and guidelines, meeting deadlines and lots of other things that don’t come naturally if you’ve got ADHD. Happily, a number of people, including a few neurotypical types, took up the challenge. It was always a “working board,” with members taking an active role in planning and hosting events as well as tackling larger projects at times. Sometimes it was creating new services and pursuing grants to help achieve them. Twice it involved collecting fresh material  to update the ADD Reader. It’s never been an easy or immediately rewarding job. You had to really believe in the work to keep going.

A few had come to the organization looking for help for themselves or their family but ended up giving much more than they received. Some were support group facilitators who took on the larger leadership role as well. Others were professionals who worked with ADHD concerns, had been presenters, and joined the cause when asked. Occasionally, they were just friends that believed in the value of our work and felt they had something to offer. We’re grateful to have had such a diverse and hard working group of individuals.

(1) National Council of Nonprofits https://www.councilofnonprofits.org/tools-resources/board-roles-and-responsibilities#sthash.toXEpwoc

Current Board of Directors 

Denise Allan

Cassandra Hahn

Cynthia Seager, MA, LMHCA

Angela Heithaus, MD

Jill Murphy

Susan Small

 

 

Past Board Members

David Pomeroy, MD

Todd Erik Henry, JD

Jeffery Wooley, MA

Pete Terlaak

Deborah McGrew, MD

Jennifer Jurik

Steven Engle

Cheryl Comen

Holsey Satterwhite

Steve Curry, MA

Sara Gardner

Terri Walsh

Nancy Walter

David Haapala, Ph.D.

Shirley Carstens, M.S., RN, NCSN, FNASN

Don Baker, M.A., LMHC/Psychotherapist

Shannon Ronald

Judie Bilderback

Gary Dennerline, Ph.D.

Carolyn Delaney, M.Ed.

Joan Riley Jager

Julianne Owen

Gayle Rieber

Cynthia Hammer

(I apologize for not having the names of all of the former Board members. There were many others who contributed before 2002 whose names escape me. These were all  I could find online.)

“Photo courtesy of ambro/ FreeDigitalPhoto.com”

 

ADD Resources – Mission, Vision and History

0 1 addR logoADD Resources

Our Mission The mission of Attention Deficit Disorder Resources is to help people with ADHD achieve their full potential through education, support and networking opportunities.

Our Vision We serve and educate individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, those who interact with them and the community. As our resources and educational services expand, they will be made available throughout the country through technology. We will maintain a primary focus on building community among those who come to us, and we will create a support fund to assure that limited finances are not a barrier to receiving services. We will, as an organization, create partnerships and collaborations for providing more effective services and resources. Throughout all our growth we will maintain quality in all that we do. Our board will exemplify the best in nonprofit governance, and we will maintain financial independence from all special interests.

History of Attention Deficit Disorder Resources

In the fall of l992 Cynthia Hammer was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) by her son’s pediatrician. She discovered Adults with ADD by Lynn Weiss and learned, from the book’s resource list, there was another adult with ADD in Washington State–Lisa Poast in Bellingham. Cynthia called and learned that there were several of us. What a relief and joy to no longer feel alone.

In the spring of 1993, the first national ADD conference for adults was held in Ann Arbor, MI. While there, Cynthia met Brian Howell, also from Tacoma. We decided to start a support group. For over one year we met monthly at Allenmore Hospital. Our attendance ran from three to ten, but the same people rarely came twice. We changed the format to education, more than support, with a speaker at each meeting and time for questions and answers. We relocated to Jackson Hall. With these changes, our attendance grew to forty or more people. We celebrated our 10th anniversary of being incorporated as a non-profit on February 17, 2004.

Since then we have grown to have four additional support groups:

  1. A Seattle adult ADHD support group that meets monthly in the Plaza Café at University Hospital. The usual attendance is 60 or more people. In addition, they simultaneously run a group for non-ADHD partners in an adjoining room
  2. A parents’ ADHD support group that meets on Mercer Island area. This group generally is attended by 30-40 or so people.
  3. A parents’ ADHD support group that meets in Tacoma at Tacoma General Hospital, Jwing, Room #3.  It generally has up to 10 attending.
  4. An adult Support Group that meets in Olympia.

Each support group has membership materials and forms to send monthly reports to the Attention Deficit Disorder Resources (ADD Resources) office. Guidelines for support groups and for Attention Deficit Disorder Resources (ADD Resources) volunteers have been established as well as an application form for volunteers.

We produce theAdult ADD Reader, an l35 page booklet with articles written by adults with ADD as well as national ADD authorities. Past issues of our eight-page quarterly newsletter ADDult ADDvice are now available to members online.  We send out a free monthly eNews to members and nonmembers who have subscribed. Membership is $45 for the first year and $25 to renew. Membership bonuses include the Adult ADD Reader and newsletter, access to the entire website, as well as discounts on workshops and conferences.

We host a National ADHD Directory with over 1000 service providers in the U.S. listed. Currently, listing in the Directory is free. We hope to grow this Directory to over 5000 listings. In addition, our website (www.addresources.org) has over 100 free articles on ADHD. We are working to increase traffic to our website, believing that this will increase membership, a major source of revenue for us.

Each fall we sponsor a conference on ADHD with both national ADHD authorities and local ADHD professionals presenting. In addition, we offer one or more workshops during the year for teachers, parents, adults with ADHD or professionals. We offer teleconferences for those who don’t live in the Puget Sound area. Started the website and National Directory in 2001.

In 2002 we opened an office, legally changed our name from ADDult Support of Washington to Attention Deficit Disorder Resources, and expanded our services to all ages of people with AD/HD. The office is open every day from 10 am-3 p.m. People are encouraged to contact our office for information and support.

Our sources of income have been membership fees, sales of books and materials, an occasional grant, as well as workshop/conference fees.

Won’t you please take a moment to honor the work of this fine organization?  You may comment on Facebook or on our Memorial page.

Mission, Vision and History – 2010

ADD Resources

Our Mission The mission of Attention Deficit Disorder Resources is to help people with ADHD achieve their full potential through education, support and networking opportunities.

Our Vision We serve and educate individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, those who interact with them and the community. As our resources and educational services expand, they will be made available throughout the country through technology. We will maintain a primary focus on building community among those who come to us, and we will create a support fund to assure that limited finances are not a barrier to receiving services. We will, as an organization, create partnerships and collaborations for providing more effective services and resources. Throughout all our growth we will maintain quality in all that we do. Our board will exemplify the best in nonprofit governance, and we will maintain financial independence from all special interests.

History of Attention Deficit Disorder Resources

In the fall of l992 Cynthia Hammer was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) by her son’s pediatrician. She discovered Adults with ADD by Lynn Weiss and learned, from the book’s resource list, there was another adult with ADD in Washington State–Lisa Poast in Bellingham. Cynthia called and learned that there were several of us. What a relief and joy to no longer feel alone.

In the spring of 1993, the first national ADD conference for adults was held in Ann Arbor, MI. While there, Cynthia met Brian Howell, also from Tacoma. We decided to start a support group. For over one year we met monthly at Allenmore Hospital. Our attendance ran from three to ten, but the same people rarely came twice. We changed the format to education, more than support, with a speaker at each meeting and time for questions and answers. We relocated to Jackson Hall. With these changes, our attendance grew to forty or more people. We celebrated our 10th anniversary of being incorporated as a non-profit on February 17, 2004.

Since then we have grown to have four additional support groups:

  1. A Seattle adult ADHD support group that meets monthly in the Plaza Café at University Hospital. The usual attendance is 60 or more people. In addition, they simultaneously run a group for non-ADHD partners in an adjoining room
  2. A parents’ ADHD support group that meets on Mercer Island area. This group generally is attended by 30-40 or so people.
  3. A parents’ ADHD support group that meets in Tacoma at Tacoma General Hospital, Jwing, Room #3.  It generally has up to 10 attending.
  4. An adult Support Group that meets in Olympia.

Each support group has membership materials and forms to send monthly reports to the Attention Deficit Disorder Resources (ADD Resources) office. Guidelines for support groups and for Attention Deficit Disorder Resources (ADD Resources) volunteers have been established as well as an application form for volunteers.

We produce theAdult ADD Reader, an l35 page booklet with articles written by adults with ADD as well as national ADD authorities. Past issues of our eight-page quarterly newsletter ADDult ADDvice are now available to members online.  We send out a free monthly eNews to members and nonmembers who have subscribed. Membership is $45 for the first year and $25 to renew. Membership bonuses include the Adult ADD Reader and newsletter, access to the entire website, as well as discounts on workshops and conferences.

We host a National ADHD Directory with over 1000 service providers in the U.S. listed. Currently, listing in the Directory is free. We hope to grow this Directory to over 5000 listings. In addition, our website (www.addresources.org) has over 100 free articles on ADHD. We are working to increase traffic to our website, believing that this will increase membership, a major source of revenue for us.

Each fall we sponsor a conference on ADHD with both national ADHD authorities and local ADHD professionals presenting. In addition, we offer one or more workshops during the year for teachers, parents, adults with ADHD or professionals. We offer teleconferences for those who don’t live in the Puget Sound area. Started the website and National Directory in 2001.

In 2002 we opened an office, legally changed our name from ADDult Support of Washington to Attention Deficit Disorder Resources, and expanded our services to all ages of people with AD/HD. The office is open every day from 10 am-3 p.m. People are encouraged to contact our office for information and support.

Our sources of income have been membership fees, sales of books and materials, an occasional grant, as well as workshop/conference fees.

 

Podcasts and Webinars Library

0 1 Podcasts and Webinars (1)

“Photo courtesy of stock photos/FreeDigitalPhotos.net” Modified on Canva.com

Welcome to ADD Resources Podcast Library – A benefit of membership!

 

Academic Issues

  • ADD in the Schools of the Future by Jeff Woolley, MA, MIT
  • Gifted Children with ADHD by Deirdre V. Lovecky, PhD
  • ADD and School: Keys to Success by Brenda Nicholson
  • Testing and Accommodations by Nancie Payne, Ph.D.
  • Summer Strategies to Prep for College by Vicky Ball, ADHD Coach
  • School Success!: Strategies that Work by Chris Dendy, M.S.
  • Ten Key Facts Everyone Must Know about ADHD by Chris Dendy, M.S.
  • Working with Your Child’s School: IEP/504 Plans by Larry Davis, M.Ed.
  • Transition Planning for Students with ADHD by Karen Anderson
  • Individuals with ADHD and/or LD-At Risk by Marcee Kueckelhan
  • Career Planning for College Students with ADHD by Victoria Ball, M.Ed.
  • Tips for College Students by Victoria Ball, M.Ed., ADD Career Coach

Co-Existing Conditions

  • ADD and Addictions by Lyn Purpura
  • ADHD and Motor Coordination/Dyspraxia by Deborah McGrew, MD, OT
  • Healing from Brain Injuries by Daniel Amen and Mike Marino
  • Battling Addictions by Daniel Amen, M.D. and Mark Kosins, M.D.
  • The Link, ADD/ADHD and Chemical Dependency by Cyd Imel
  • Tourette Syndrome and Co-Morbid Conditions by Samuel Zinner, M.D.
  • ADHD, Asperger’s Syndrome, and Social Skills by Karen Roe

Coping Strategies 

  • The Inner Stages of ADD by Miriam Reiss, MCC, Spirited Marketing
  • How to Be Happy & Successful by Jennifer Koretsky, ADHD Coach
  • Many Masks of ADD by Linda Roggli.
  • ADHD and Mindfulness by Judi Jerome LICSW, LADC
  • Selecting and Sticking with a System by Rachael Eaton, R.C.
  • Upwrapping the Gift of the ADD Mind by Edward Hallowell, M.D.
  • Procrastination by Rhonda Pawlan, ADHD Coach
  • Think Postive and Kill the ANTS by Daniel Amen and Mike Marino.
  • Tips for the Stay-at-Home ADHD Mom or Dad by Sandy Maynard, Coach
  • How to Do Less (And Why) by Frances Strassman, Professional Organizer
  • The Joy of ADHD: Flourishing with Adult ADHD by Miriam Reiss, MCC.
  • Women with ADHD by Linda Roggli, ACC, Certified Life Coach
  • Why We Lose Things by Frances Strassman, Professional Organizer
  • Overcoming Procrastination by Rhonda Pawlan, ADHD Coach
  • Spiritual Principles & Practices for Thriving w/ ADHD by Pauline Laurent

Diagnosis & Treatment

  • New and Updated Information about ADHD by Victoria Ball, M.ED, MCC
  • Recognizing & Treating ADHD in Boys and Men by George Kapalka, Ph.D.
  • Resolve ADHD Diagnosis & Confusion by Richard L. Rubin, M.D.
  • New Developments in ADHD Medications by Kenny Handelman, MD
  • Manage ADHD So That It Benefits the Child at Home, School, and on the Playgroundby Peter Jensen, M.D
  • New Frontiers in ADHD: What is it, What Causes it, and How is it Best Treated? by Peter Jensen, M.D.
  • A Physician’s Perspective: ADHD Medications by Ted Mandelkorn, M.D
  • The ABC’s of ADHD by Dave Pomeroy, M.D.
  • I am on Medication, What Can I Expect?by Deborah Bunger, MD
  • Good News: Bad News by Peter Jensen, M.D.
  • ADHD: Not Just for Boys Anymore by Patricia Quinn, M.D.
  • Why ADHD Looks Like a Problem of Willpower by Thomas E. Brown, Ph.D.

Parenting

  • Dealing with ADHD: Siblings & the Family Unit by Keath Low
  • Parenting Your Behaviorally Challenging Child by Sara Gardner
  • Navigating ADHD: A Practical Path by Tracey Goodwin & Holly Oberacker
  • Parenting Impulsive and Oppositional Children by George Kapalka, Ph.D.
  • Communicating with Your Teen by Debi Bailey, Certified Parent Coach
  • Solutions to Boosting Self-Esteem by Kerin Adams
  • Coaching Teens/College Students with AD/HD by Jodi Sleeper-Triplett
  • Contracts & Chore Programs for Adolescents by Gregory S. Greenberg
  • The Parent Toolkit by Ron Feinberg, LICSW
  • Developing Resilience in Children with ADHD by Sam Goldstein, Ph.D.
  • Raising A.D.D. Kids by Daniel Amen, MD and Mark Kosins,MD
  • Dealing with Difficult Teenagers by Daniel Amen and Todd Clements,MD
  • Differential Diagnosis: Is it ADHD or..? by Cherie Valeithian, PhD
  • Utilize Good & Bad of ADHD to Change Behavior by Douglas Chandler
  • Strategies for Improving Behavior, Motivation, and Responsibility in Children and Adolescents with ADHD by Gregory Greenberg, Ph.D.

Relationships

  • Success Strategies for Couples by Gina Pera, ADHD Coach
  • Is It You, Me or Adult ADD? Gina Pera, Relationship Expert
  • Relationship Roadblocks by Scott Lewis, MSW, Co-Active Coach
  • Relationships: Avoiding Friction & Frustration by Bonnie Mincu, Coach
  • The Benefits of Boundaries by Tereasa Jones, MS
  • Improving Your ADHD Relationships and Friendships by Ari Tuckman, Ph.D., ADHD therapist
  • HELP! I’m Married to a Person with ADHD! by Susan Tschudi LMFT

Skill Building

  • Money Matters by Stephanie Moulton, PhD and Ari Tuckman, PsyD
  • Mindfulness, Hypnotherapy and Executive Functioning by Don Kerson MD
  • Organize Your Clutter by Carrie Greene, ADD Coach
  • Exercise: How to Make Time for It by Sandy Maynard, ADHD Coach
  • Insightful Thinking and How It Can Help ADDers by Jeff Copper, MBA
  • Overcoming Executive Function Weaknesses by Ari Tuckman, PsyD, MBA
  • Coaching Your ADHD Brain by Nancy A. Ratey, EdM, MCC, SCAC
  • How to Have More Productive Days by Miriam Reiss
  • Is “Late Again” Your Middle Name by Cynthia Hammer, MSW
  • What is ADD Coaching? by Carol Gignoux and Nancy Pagan
  • Finding the Obvious Solutions When They Are Not So Obvious! by Jeff Copper, MBA, ACC, CPCC, ACG
  • Explanation or Excuse? Take Charge of Your Life by Ari Tuckman, Ph.D.
  • Everything You Wanted to Know About Coaching But Were Afraid to Ask byNancy Ratey, M. Ed., MCC ADHD Coach
  • Essential Skills for Managing Adult ADHD by Jennifer Koretsky, ADHD Coach
  • Put Your Oxygen Mask on First-Basic Self Care for Adults with ADHD byKate Kelly, MSN, ACT, ADD Coach
  • ADD in the Spirit by Kate Kelly, MSN, ADD Coach
  • I Have ADHD. Do I Have to Be Disorganized, Too? by Carrie Greene, ADD Coach, Professional Organizer
  • Creating A Structured Environment by Carrie Greene, ADD Coach, Professional Organizer
  • Packing for a Vacation by Sandy Maynard, ADHD Coach

Workplace Issues

  • To Tell or Not to Tell in the Workplace by Ari Tuckman, Ph.D
  • ADD in the Workplace by Victoria Ball, M.ED, SCAC, ADD Career Coach
  • Thriving in Organizations with ADHD by Bonnie Mincu, ADD Coach
  • How to Create a Career That Works for You & Your ADD by Miriam Reiss
  • AD/HD in the Workplace: Help for your Career by Marjorie Johnson, ACC, DCSW, LCSWr
  • Help! I Need an Accommodation or Do I? by Nancie Payne, M.S.

Found on the WayBack Machine – October 17, 2012

https://web.archive.org/web/20120801000000*/http://addresources.org