Author Archives: joanjager@live.com

Early Supporters

0 1 Our ThanksI wish I could thank every donor for their interest and support. We couldn’t have survived without anyone of you. Here are just a few examples of the many ways that leaders in the field of ADHD contributed to our efforts.

Drs. Ned Hallowell and John Ratey were early supporters, contributing articles for the Adult ADD Reader that helped fund the organization. Hallowell gave numerous talks in the early years, including a Training Seminar for Professionals and was our first main Conference presenter. Perhaps, your first connection with ADD Resources was talking with Cynthia at home or later calling the office for help after seeing the phone number listed in the Resource section at the back of their classic book,  Driven to Distraction.

We could always count on Daniel Amen, of Healing ADD and PBS fame, to attract a crowd. He often donated his time when presenting for us and once contributed a free ADHD evaluation, complete with SPECT Brain Scans, to a fundraising raffle. Did you enter to win? Ted Mandelkorn, M.D. from Mercer Island was also a wonderful friend. Always generous, he wrote an extensive article on ADHD medication, presented at the first Parent and Teacher Workshops and every conference thereafter for gratis. David Pomeroy, M.D. not only presented, he also served on the Board for two terms. Therapist Don Baker and ADHD coach Pete Terlaak both led the Seattle support group at different times as well as serving as Board president.  (Pete Terlaak – http://coachforfreedom.com/)

Non-profit organizations depend on the kindness of friends and strangers. You could list services for free in Our National ADHD Provider Directory, but many chose to contribute through Professional membership. In time, we built a group of loyal members who provided a solid funding base, but other donations also helped provide services we wanted to offer. Many authors sent us a number of their books to contribute to our growing Lending Library. Sam Goldstein sent us copies of his documentary on Resilience DVDs after presenting at a conference.

Sandra Reif donated enough training DVDs and other material to provide every Teacher a bonus packet worth more than their cost to attend the workshop. Chris Zeigler-Dendy made her great “ADHD is the Tip of the Iceberg” posters available at cost, so we could send them out to schools to post in the teachers’ lounge. Sari Solden came to lead our intimate Women’s Retreat in 2004 and gave a public talk the night before as well. William W. Dodson, M.D. arranged to have his speaking fee covered after realizing how tight our budget was. These are a just a few examples of how strangers united in service became a positive force in spreading ADHD awareness. Please help support those ADHD nonprofits who still serve the public so well.

 

Note: We couldn’t have succeeded without the support of local ADHD professionals. We depended on them both to promote our organization and to present for support groups, a workshop or at a conference.  A large number also supported our work through membership. Many of the providers listed in this informal collection Washington State ADHD Treatment Providers were chosen because of their involvement with ADD Resources or CHADD affiliates.

ADD Resources Board Members

0 1 Board

Always good to see you again. Now, let’s get work.

Our board members have been some of our most important volunteers. Board members play an important role in the governance of a nonprofit. Serving without compensation, they determine the Mission and Vision of the organization and plan how to best provide the services that further those aims. “Rather than steer the boat by managing day-to-day operations, board members provide foresight, oversight, and insight.” (1)They also work to ensure the financial stability of the organization by raising funds and providing careful stewardship.

In other words, it involves a lot of boring meetings, careful planning, following strict rules and guidelines, meeting deadlines and lots of other things that don’t come naturally if you’ve got ADHD. Happily, a number of people, including a few neurotypical types, took up the challenge. It was always a “working board,” with members taking an active role in planning and hosting events as well as tackling larger projects at times. Sometimes it was creating new services and pursuing grants to help achieve them. Twice it involved collecting fresh material  to update the ADD Reader. It’s never been an easy or immediately rewarding job. You had to really believe in the work to keep going.

A few had come to the organization looking for help for themselves or their family but ended up giving much more than they received. Some were support group facilitators who took on the larger leadership role as well. Others were professionals who worked with ADHD concerns, had been presenters, and joined the cause when asked. Occasionally, they were just friends that believed in the value of our work and felt they had something to offer. We’re grateful to have had such a diverse and hard working group of individuals.

(1) National Council of Nonprofits https://www.councilofnonprofits.org/tools-resources/board-roles-and-responsibilities#sthash.toXEpwoc

Current Board of Directors 

Denise Allan

Cassandra Hahn

Cynthia Seager, MA, LMHCA

Angela Heithaus, MD

Jill Murphy

Susan Small

 

 

Past Board Members

David Pomeroy, MD

Todd Erik Henry, JD

Jeffery Wooley, MA

Pete Terlaak

Deborah McGrew, MD

Jennifer Jurik

Steven Engle

Cheryl Comen

Holsey Satterwhite

Steve Curry, MA

Sara Gardner

Terri Walsh

Nancy Walter

David Haapala, Ph.D.

Shirley Carstens, M.S., RN, NCSN, FNASN

Don Baker, M.A., LMHC/Psychotherapist

Shannon Ronald

Judie Bilderback

Gary Dennerline, Ph.D.

Carolyn Delaney, M.Ed.

Joan Riley Jager

Julianne Owen

Gayle Rieber

Cynthia Hammer

(I apologize for not having the names of all of the former Board members. There were many others who contributed before 2002 whose names escape me. These were all  I could find online.)

“Photo courtesy of ambro/ FreeDigitalPhoto.com”

 

ADD Resources – Mission, Vision and History

0 1 addR logoADD Resources

Our Mission The mission of Attention Deficit Disorder Resources is to help people with ADHD achieve their full potential through education, support and networking opportunities.

Our Vision We serve and educate individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, those who interact with them and the community. As our resources and educational services expand, they will be made available throughout the country through technology. We will maintain a primary focus on building community among those who come to us, and we will create a support fund to assure that limited finances are not a barrier to receiving services. We will, as an organization, create partnerships and collaborations for providing more effective services and resources. Throughout all our growth we will maintain quality in all that we do. Our board will exemplify the best in nonprofit governance, and we will maintain financial independence from all special interests.

History of Attention Deficit Disorder Resources

In the fall of l992 Cynthia Hammer was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) by her son’s pediatrician. She discovered Adults with ADD by Lynn Weiss and learned, from the book’s resource list, there was another adult with ADD in Washington State–Lisa Poast in Bellingham. Cynthia called and learned that there were several of us. What a relief and joy to no longer feel alone.

In the spring of 1993, the first national ADD conference for adults was held in Ann Arbor, MI. While there, Cynthia met Brian Howell, also from Tacoma. We decided to start a support group. For over one year we met monthly at Allenmore Hospital. Our attendance ran from three to ten, but the same people rarely came twice. We changed the format to education, more than support, with a speaker at each meeting and time for questions and answers. We relocated to Jackson Hall. With these changes, our attendance grew to forty or more people. We celebrated our 10th anniversary of being incorporated as a non-profit on February 17, 2004.

Since then we have grown to have four additional support groups:

  1. A Seattle adult ADHD support group that meets monthly in the Plaza Café at University Hospital. The usual attendance is 60 or more people. In addition, they simultaneously run a group for non-ADHD partners in an adjoining room
  2. A parents’ ADHD support group that meets on Mercer Island area. This group generally is attended by 30-40 or so people.
  3. A parents’ ADHD support group that meets in Tacoma at Tacoma General Hospital, Jwing, Room #3.  It generally has up to 10 attending.
  4. An adult Support Group that meets in Olympia.

Each support group has membership materials and forms to send monthly reports to the Attention Deficit Disorder Resources (ADD Resources) office. Guidelines for support groups and for Attention Deficit Disorder Resources (ADD Resources) volunteers have been established as well as an application form for volunteers.

We produce theAdult ADD Reader, an l35 page booklet with articles written by adults with ADD as well as national ADD authorities. Past issues of our eight-page quarterly newsletter ADDult ADDvice are now available to members online.  We send out a free monthly eNews to members and nonmembers who have subscribed. Membership is $45 for the first year and $25 to renew. Membership bonuses include the Adult ADD Reader and newsletter, access to the entire website, as well as discounts on workshops and conferences.

We host a National ADHD Directory with over 1000 service providers in the U.S. listed. Currently, listing in the Directory is free. We hope to grow this Directory to over 5000 listings. In addition, our website (www.addresources.org) has over 100 free articles on ADHD. We are working to increase traffic to our website, believing that this will increase membership, a major source of revenue for us.

Each fall we sponsor a conference on ADHD with both national ADHD authorities and local ADHD professionals presenting. In addition, we offer one or more workshops during the year for teachers, parents, adults with ADHD or professionals. We offer teleconferences for those who don’t live in the Puget Sound area. Started the website and National Directory in 2001.

In 2002 we opened an office, legally changed our name from ADDult Support of Washington to Attention Deficit Disorder Resources, and expanded our services to all ages of people with AD/HD. The office is open every day from 10 am-3 p.m. People are encouraged to contact our office for information and support.

Our sources of income have been membership fees, sales of books and materials, an occasional grant, as well as workshop/conference fees.

Won’t you please take a moment to honor the work of this fine organization?  You may comment on Facebook or on our Memorial page.

Support Group Leaders – Past and Present

0 1 The Power of the GroupSupport Group Facilitators

Support group leaders are often the first friendly face that people associated with ADD Resources. Few have taken on the challenge. Yet, many have served for a number of years. Their commitment to the organization and members of their group is evident at every meeting. They must plan for, schedule presenters, and host welcoming and informative events every month.

Keeping the meetings interesting and on track, not allowing people to wander too far off topic and to keep peace amongst a diverse group, is a real art. For years, they also had to store and haul the group’s Lending Library, cartons full of books and audio and video tapes, back and forth to meetings. Facilitators provide new understanding and valuable tools for coping with the challenges of ADHD. Seeing and hearing about the positive results and changes lives of their members is their highest reward. We’re so grateful that they felt the position of leadership important enough to be worth the effort.

Some support will still be available despite ADD Resources’ closing.  Find them here: ADHD Support groups in Washington State.  Get on their mailing lists if you’d like to be kept up-to-date.

Seattle, WA – Adult & Partner groups

Cynthia Seager, MA, LMHCA and Cassady Kintner, LMFTA

Tacoma, WA – Adult

Brandon Rowe and Joan Riley Jager

Olympia, WA – Adult and Parents

 Beth Thompson, Marilyn Duff, Susan Kibbey and Gary Holt)

Bellevue, WA – Parent (Eastside)

Diana Wallace and Jill Murphy

Lake Forest Park, WA – Adult

Frank Shuck

Wenatchee, WA – Adult

Russ Alman

 

 

Former Group Facilitators

Nancy Holmes – Seattle

Don Baker, MA – Seattle

Pete Terlaak , CPC – Seattle

Margaret Sutro, MA, LMHC – Seattle

Jayne Carlin – Bellevue Parents

Linda Van Hook-Briganti – Olympia

Kathy Engel – Tacoma Adults

Brandon Koch – Tacoma Adults

Jennifer Jurik – Tacoma Adults

Jill Murphy – Tacoma Parents group

Jupe Johnson – Bellingham

Meg McDonald – Basic Introduction group in Seattle as well as the Lake Forest group

Chris and Anita Norman – Bellingham & Burlington 

Margit Crane – Seattle Parents

Joan Riley Jager – Tacoma Adults

Cynthia Hammer- Tacoma Adults

We also had a Shelton Parents group and one in Portland for about a year each. Unfortunately, I no longer have the names of their leaders.

 

“Photo courtesy of Luigi/FreeDogitalPhot.net” Modified on Canva

 

Mission, Vision and History – 2010

ADD Resources

Our Mission The mission of Attention Deficit Disorder Resources is to help people with ADHD achieve their full potential through education, support and networking opportunities.

Our Vision We serve and educate individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, those who interact with them and the community. As our resources and educational services expand, they will be made available throughout the country through technology. We will maintain a primary focus on building community among those who come to us, and we will create a support fund to assure that limited finances are not a barrier to receiving services. We will, as an organization, create partnerships and collaborations for providing more effective services and resources. Throughout all our growth we will maintain quality in all that we do. Our board will exemplify the best in nonprofit governance, and we will maintain financial independence from all special interests.

History of Attention Deficit Disorder Resources

In the fall of l992 Cynthia Hammer was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) by her son’s pediatrician. She discovered Adults with ADD by Lynn Weiss and learned, from the book’s resource list, there was another adult with ADD in Washington State–Lisa Poast in Bellingham. Cynthia called and learned that there were several of us. What a relief and joy to no longer feel alone.

In the spring of 1993, the first national ADD conference for adults was held in Ann Arbor, MI. While there, Cynthia met Brian Howell, also from Tacoma. We decided to start a support group. For over one year we met monthly at Allenmore Hospital. Our attendance ran from three to ten, but the same people rarely came twice. We changed the format to education, more than support, with a speaker at each meeting and time for questions and answers. We relocated to Jackson Hall. With these changes, our attendance grew to forty or more people. We celebrated our 10th anniversary of being incorporated as a non-profit on February 17, 2004.

Since then we have grown to have four additional support groups:

  1. A Seattle adult ADHD support group that meets monthly in the Plaza Café at University Hospital. The usual attendance is 60 or more people. In addition, they simultaneously run a group for non-ADHD partners in an adjoining room
  2. A parents’ ADHD support group that meets on Mercer Island area. This group generally is attended by 30-40 or so people.
  3. A parents’ ADHD support group that meets in Tacoma at Tacoma General Hospital, Jwing, Room #3.  It generally has up to 10 attending.
  4. An adult Support Group that meets in Olympia.

Each support group has membership materials and forms to send monthly reports to the Attention Deficit Disorder Resources (ADD Resources) office. Guidelines for support groups and for Attention Deficit Disorder Resources (ADD Resources) volunteers have been established as well as an application form for volunteers.

We produce theAdult ADD Reader, an l35 page booklet with articles written by adults with ADD as well as national ADD authorities. Past issues of our eight-page quarterly newsletter ADDult ADDvice are now available to members online.  We send out a free monthly eNews to members and nonmembers who have subscribed. Membership is $45 for the first year and $25 to renew. Membership bonuses include the Adult ADD Reader and newsletter, access to the entire website, as well as discounts on workshops and conferences.

We host a National ADHD Directory with over 1000 service providers in the U.S. listed. Currently, listing in the Directory is free. We hope to grow this Directory to over 5000 listings. In addition, our website (www.addresources.org) has over 100 free articles on ADHD. We are working to increase traffic to our website, believing that this will increase membership, a major source of revenue for us.

Each fall we sponsor a conference on ADHD with both national ADHD authorities and local ADHD professionals presenting. In addition, we offer one or more workshops during the year for teachers, parents, adults with ADHD or professionals. We offer teleconferences for those who don’t live in the Puget Sound area. Started the website and National Directory in 2001.

In 2002 we opened an office, legally changed our name from ADDult Support of Washington to Attention Deficit Disorder Resources, and expanded our services to all ages of people with AD/HD. The office is open every day from 10 am-3 p.m. People are encouraged to contact our office for information and support.

Our sources of income have been membership fees, sales of books and materials, an occasional grant, as well as workshop/conference fees.

 

ADHD Information and Support Services

Information and Support         Websites       ADHD Nonprofits

Information and Support Services

 Phone and email help through the National Resource Center on ADHD Hot Line, a program of CHADD subsidized by government grants

  • The NRC is the only national resource where people can receive an individualized response from a Health Information Specialist knowledgeable in the full range of issues concerning ADHD. We receive inquiries from all over the United States and more than 20 countries. Our English and Spanish-speaking Health Information Specialists respond to queries Monday–Friday, 1–5pm EST. If you have a question or would like to talk to somebody about ADHD, call 800.233.4050.
  • http://www.chadd.org/Understanding-ADHD/The-National-Resource-Center-on-ADHD-Helpline.aspx

You can also call 211 to locate services. They may help you appropriate treatment and agencies. There’s also a website if you want to search for  yourself. ADHD, Learning Disabilities or Parenting classes yield good results. Washington Information Network – 211

Washington State Nonprofit and State Organizations – A good collection of local agencies offering help for ADHD, Learning Disabilities, and Mental Health. –  Find support groups, information, provider directories, educational advocacy, parenting classes, and low-cost services.

Washington State ADHD Treatment Providers – Note: ADD freeSources does not endorse or recommend any provider or services listed. Nor should NOT being included on the list affect your choice of provider. Most were chosen simply because they were associated with ADD Resources or local CHADD groups at some time and I could find their contact information.

 

Support groups

Many groups will continue to meet.  Olympia has a new location, but the others will continue to meet at the same time and places. Get on your local group’s mailing list so you can keep in touch.

Adult Support groups meet in Seattle, Tacoma, and Olympia.

CHADD sponsors Parent groups in Bellevue, Kirkland, Renton, University Place, and Silverdale.

 

Websites

  • ADHD Websites– From Starter Information to Comprehensive Coverage

 
Follow ADHD / ADD freeSources’ board ADHD Websites and blogs on Pinterest.

Other ADHD nonprofits

 Join CHADD – http://www.chadd.org/  The leading non-profit national organization for children and adults with ADHD hosts hundreds of local support groups around the nation. They have an informative website, run the National ADHD Resource Center and publish Attention Magazine. FREE Monthly Ask the Experts Chats and/or Webinars. They’ve also got a great Facebook page!   (Membership – Individual or family – $53, Student $41, Professional $130)

Get on their mailing list!

 

Join ADDA (Adults with ADD) – Membership is key  to access on-line support and personal contact through their ambassador program and peer support groups- http://www.add.org/ Must be a member to access their monthly Webinars, $10 for others, but they have top names presenting. Thier website and monthly email are FREE to all.  ($55 a year for a family, $20 for students, and $50 for individuals) Can be paid monthly.

 

 

Podcasts and Webinars Library

0 1 Podcasts and Webinars (1)

“Photo courtesy of stock photos/FreeDigitalPhotos.net” Modified on Canva.com

Welcome to ADD Resources Podcast Library – A benefit of membership!

 

Academic Issues

  • ADD in the Schools of the Future by Jeff Woolley, MA, MIT
  • Gifted Children with ADHD by Deirdre V. Lovecky, PhD
  • ADD and School: Keys to Success by Brenda Nicholson
  • Testing and Accommodations by Nancie Payne, Ph.D.
  • Summer Strategies to Prep for College by Vicky Ball, ADHD Coach
  • School Success!: Strategies that Work by Chris Dendy, M.S.
  • Ten Key Facts Everyone Must Know about ADHD by Chris Dendy, M.S.
  • Working with Your Child’s School: IEP/504 Plans by Larry Davis, M.Ed.
  • Transition Planning for Students with ADHD by Karen Anderson
  • Individuals with ADHD and/or LD-At Risk by Marcee Kueckelhan
  • Career Planning for College Students with ADHD by Victoria Ball, M.Ed.
  • Tips for College Students by Victoria Ball, M.Ed., ADD Career Coach

Co-Existing Conditions

  • ADD and Addictions by Lyn Purpura
  • ADHD and Motor Coordination/Dyspraxia by Deborah McGrew, MD, OT
  • Healing from Brain Injuries by Daniel Amen and Mike Marino
  • Battling Addictions by Daniel Amen, M.D. and Mark Kosins, M.D.
  • The Link, ADD/ADHD and Chemical Dependency by Cyd Imel
  • Tourette Syndrome and Co-Morbid Conditions by Samuel Zinner, M.D.
  • ADHD, Asperger’s Syndrome, and Social Skills by Karen Roe

Coping Strategies 

  • The Inner Stages of ADD by Miriam Reiss, MCC, Spirited Marketing
  • How to Be Happy & Successful by Jennifer Koretsky, ADHD Coach
  • Many Masks of ADD by Linda Roggli.
  • ADHD and Mindfulness by Judi Jerome LICSW, LADC
  • Selecting and Sticking with a System by Rachael Eaton, R.C.
  • Upwrapping the Gift of the ADD Mind by Edward Hallowell, M.D.
  • Procrastination by Rhonda Pawlan, ADHD Coach
  • Think Postive and Kill the ANTS by Daniel Amen and Mike Marino.
  • Tips for the Stay-at-Home ADHD Mom or Dad by Sandy Maynard, Coach
  • How to Do Less (And Why) by Frances Strassman, Professional Organizer
  • The Joy of ADHD: Flourishing with Adult ADHD by Miriam Reiss, MCC.
  • Women with ADHD by Linda Roggli, ACC, Certified Life Coach
  • Why We Lose Things by Frances Strassman, Professional Organizer
  • Overcoming Procrastination by Rhonda Pawlan, ADHD Coach
  • Spiritual Principles & Practices for Thriving w/ ADHD by Pauline Laurent

Diagnosis & Treatment

  • New and Updated Information about ADHD by Victoria Ball, M.ED, MCC
  • Recognizing & Treating ADHD in Boys and Men by George Kapalka, Ph.D.
  • Resolve ADHD Diagnosis & Confusion by Richard L. Rubin, M.D.
  • New Developments in ADHD Medications by Kenny Handelman, MD
  • Manage ADHD So That It Benefits the Child at Home, School, and on the Playgroundby Peter Jensen, M.D
  • New Frontiers in ADHD: What is it, What Causes it, and How is it Best Treated? by Peter Jensen, M.D.
  • A Physician’s Perspective: ADHD Medications by Ted Mandelkorn, M.D
  • The ABC’s of ADHD by Dave Pomeroy, M.D.
  • I am on Medication, What Can I Expect?by Deborah Bunger, MD
  • Good News: Bad News by Peter Jensen, M.D.
  • ADHD: Not Just for Boys Anymore by Patricia Quinn, M.D.
  • Why ADHD Looks Like a Problem of Willpower by Thomas E. Brown, Ph.D.

Parenting

  • Dealing with ADHD: Siblings & the Family Unit by Keath Low
  • Parenting Your Behaviorally Challenging Child by Sara Gardner
  • Navigating ADHD: A Practical Path by Tracey Goodwin & Holly Oberacker
  • Parenting Impulsive and Oppositional Children by George Kapalka, Ph.D.
  • Communicating with Your Teen by Debi Bailey, Certified Parent Coach
  • Solutions to Boosting Self-Esteem by Kerin Adams
  • Coaching Teens/College Students with AD/HD by Jodi Sleeper-Triplett
  • Contracts & Chore Programs for Adolescents by Gregory S. Greenberg
  • The Parent Toolkit by Ron Feinberg, LICSW
  • Developing Resilience in Children with ADHD by Sam Goldstein, Ph.D.
  • Raising A.D.D. Kids by Daniel Amen, MD and Mark Kosins,MD
  • Dealing with Difficult Teenagers by Daniel Amen and Todd Clements,MD
  • Differential Diagnosis: Is it ADHD or..? by Cherie Valeithian, PhD
  • Utilize Good & Bad of ADHD to Change Behavior by Douglas Chandler
  • Strategies for Improving Behavior, Motivation, and Responsibility in Children and Adolescents with ADHD by Gregory Greenberg, Ph.D.

Relationships

  • Success Strategies for Couples by Gina Pera, ADHD Coach
  • Is It You, Me or Adult ADD? Gina Pera, Relationship Expert
  • Relationship Roadblocks by Scott Lewis, MSW, Co-Active Coach
  • Relationships: Avoiding Friction & Frustration by Bonnie Mincu, Coach
  • The Benefits of Boundaries by Tereasa Jones, MS
  • Improving Your ADHD Relationships and Friendships by Ari Tuckman, Ph.D., ADHD therapist
  • HELP! I’m Married to a Person with ADHD! by Susan Tschudi LMFT

Skill Building

  • Money Matters by Stephanie Moulton, PhD and Ari Tuckman, PsyD
  • Mindfulness, Hypnotherapy and Executive Functioning by Don Kerson MD
  • Organize Your Clutter by Carrie Greene, ADD Coach
  • Exercise: How to Make Time for It by Sandy Maynard, ADHD Coach
  • Insightful Thinking and How It Can Help ADDers by Jeff Copper, MBA
  • Overcoming Executive Function Weaknesses by Ari Tuckman, PsyD, MBA
  • Coaching Your ADHD Brain by Nancy A. Ratey, EdM, MCC, SCAC
  • How to Have More Productive Days by Miriam Reiss
  • Is “Late Again” Your Middle Name by Cynthia Hammer, MSW
  • What is ADD Coaching? by Carol Gignoux and Nancy Pagan
  • Finding the Obvious Solutions When They Are Not So Obvious! by Jeff Copper, MBA, ACC, CPCC, ACG
  • Explanation or Excuse? Take Charge of Your Life by Ari Tuckman, Ph.D.
  • Everything You Wanted to Know About Coaching But Were Afraid to Ask byNancy Ratey, M. Ed., MCC ADHD Coach
  • Essential Skills for Managing Adult ADHD by Jennifer Koretsky, ADHD Coach
  • Put Your Oxygen Mask on First-Basic Self Care for Adults with ADHD byKate Kelly, MSN, ACT, ADD Coach
  • ADD in the Spirit by Kate Kelly, MSN, ADD Coach
  • I Have ADHD. Do I Have to Be Disorganized, Too? by Carrie Greene, ADD Coach, Professional Organizer
  • Creating A Structured Environment by Carrie Greene, ADD Coach, Professional Organizer
  • Packing for a Vacation by Sandy Maynard, ADHD Coach

Workplace Issues

  • To Tell or Not to Tell in the Workplace by Ari Tuckman, Ph.D
  • ADD in the Workplace by Victoria Ball, M.ED, SCAC, ADD Career Coach
  • Thriving in Organizations with ADHD by Bonnie Mincu, ADD Coach
  • How to Create a Career That Works for You & Your ADD by Miriam Reiss
  • AD/HD in the Workplace: Help for your Career by Marjorie Johnson, ACC, DCSW, LCSWr
  • Help! I Need an Accommodation or Do I? by Nancie Payne, M.S.

Found on the WayBack Machine – October 17, 2012

https://web.archive.org/web/20120801000000*/http://addresources.org

Sponsored by ADD Resources – 1995 to 2011

0 1 Talks, Workshops

Collage by Cynthia Hammer – Modified on Canva.com

ADD Resources can rightfully be proud of the many events they have sponsored through the years. Funding a nonprofit while fulfilling its mission is a constant struggle. Today, a good social media campaign can deliver a good return for little manpower. Webinars and Virtual conferences can reach more people with less effort and far smaller monetary outlay. But, nothing can beat the experience of connecting on a personal level. Despite the increased demands, the reward is great. Money is necessary to keep an organization alive, but so are the connections and camaraderie of working together.

When ADD Resources first starting sponsoring educational events in 1995, it required the combined efforts of many groups and volunteers. We would conceive and lead in the execution of a proposed talk, workshop or conference, but co-hosted with other non-profits in return for their help. We depended on WA PAVE to manage the ticket sales, co-hosted with LDA of WA for their insurance, and had CHADD Northwest help promote it. We used volunteers as “slave” labor to fold and address flyers. Our mailing parties were legendary, but also a great opportunity to talk.

By 2004, much of this could be accomplished online with a bit of technical knowledge. We always needed volunteers though. We depended on Board members and volunteers to man the events. We even catered the events ourselves. As we found out when moving events to ritzier venues, every volunteer’s efforts had helped to bring in a positive cash flow. By 2006, we were also providing support and education through Webinars and podcasts. They serve a valuable need, but here is power in coming together in person that I hope will not be lost to expediency.

Conferences and Workshops Sponsored by ADD Resources

Event Title Presentation Audience Size Presenter Year
Attention Deficit Disorder Public Talk 300 Edward Hallowell, MD 1995
Attention Deficit Disorder Public Talk 200 Edward Hallowell 1995
Attention Deficit Disorder Prof. Workshop 55 Edward Hallowell 1995
Windows into ADD Mind Public Talk 300 Daniel Amen. MD 1996
Windows into ADD Mind Public Talk 250 Daniel Amen 1996
Diagnosing & Treating ADD in Children, Adolescents & Adults Prof. Workshop
Tacoma, WA
700 Daniel Amen 1996
Attention Deficit Disorder Public Talk 300 Wendy Richardson, MA, LMFCC 1997
Attention Deficit Disorder Public Talk 200 Wendy Richardson 1997
The Link Between ADDisorder & Addictions Prof. Workshop 60 Wendy Richardson 1997
ADD Through the Lifespan Public Talk 200 Thomas Phelan, PhD 1998
ADD Through the Lifespan Public Talk 250 Thomas Phelan 1998
Diagnosing & Treating ADD in Adult Prof. Workshop 200 Thomas Phelan 1998
Disciplining the Difficult Child Parent/Teacher Workshop 250 Thomas Phelan 1998
ADHD in the Bedroom Public Talk 50 Kate Kelly, MSN 1999
Non-Traditional Strategies for Time Management and Personal Effectiveness Public Workshop
Tacoma, WA
75 Jan Thomas, M.A. 1999
The ADD Marriage: Is This as Good as It Gets? Public Workshop
Tacoma, WA
60 Carol Flannigan, M.S.W.
Nancy Holm, M.A.
1999
Women & ADD-Double Jeopardy Public Talk
Tukwila, WA
200 Kathleen Nadeau, Ph.D. 1999
Women & ADD-Double Jeopardy Public Talk
Tacoma, WA
150 Kathleen Nadeau, Ph.D. 1999
Develop and Implement Coping Strategies for Adults with ADD Professional Workshop
Tacoma, WA
50 Kathleen Nadeau, Ph.D. 1999
ADD/ADHD Public Talk 300 Daniel Amen, M.D. 2000
Professional and Peer Coaching Public Workshop
Tacoma, WA
75 Lisa Poast and Bernie Feldman, ADD coaches 2000
Windows into the ADD Mind Public Talk
Seattle, WA
300 Daniel Amen. M.D. 2001
Diagnosing and Treating ADD in Children, Adolescents and Adults Professional Workshop
Seattle, WA
250 Daniel Amen. M.D. 2001
Diagnosing and Treating ADD in Children, Adolescents and Adults Professional Workshop
Tacoma, WA
200 Daniel Amen. M.D. 2001
ADD in Adolescence Public Workshop
Bellevue, WA
75 Cynthia Hammer, MSW, Ted Mandelkorn, MD, Cyd Imel, MA 2002
Healing ADD Public Talk
Tacoma, WA
200 Daniel Amen, M.D. 2002
Healing ADD Public Talk 200 Daniel Amen, M.D. 2002
Healing ADD Prof. Workshop
Tukwila, WA
350 Daniel Amen, M.D. 2002
1st Annual Managing ADHD in the Classroom Teachers’ Workshop
Bellevue, WA
150 Ted Mandelkorn, MD
Judie Bilderback, MA
2003
Master’s Class for ADHD Clinicians Professional Workshop
Bellevue, WA
50 Greg Hipskind,M.D.
Ted Mandelkorn, M.D.
Carol Flannigan, MSW
Don Baker M.A.
Brian O’Conner, M.A.
2003
1st Annual ADHD conference Public/Professionals
Tukwila, WA
200 Daniel Amen, M.D.
Sam Goldstein, Ph.D.
2003
2nd annual Managing ADHD in the Classroom Teachers’ Workshop
Bellevue, WA
150 Ted Mandelkorn, MD
Judie Bilderback, MA
2004
Journeys Through ADDulthood Public Talk
Bellevue, WA
165 Sari Solden, M.A. 2004
Renewal Retreat Women with ADD
Issaquah, WA
33 Sari Solden, M.A.
Hope Langner, MCC
2004
Event for National ADHD Awareness Day Public event
Seattle, WA
250 Patti Quinn, M.D.
Michelle Novotni, Ph.D.
David Giwerc, MCC
2004
2nd annual ADHD conference Public/Professionals
Tukwila, WA
390 Edward Hallowell, M.D.
Kathleen Nadeau, PhD
2004
3rd Annual Managing ADHD in the Classroom Teachers’ Workshop
Tacoma, WA
150 Ted Mandelkorn, MD
Judie Bilderback, MA
2005
1st Annual ADHD in the Workplace Workshop Public workshop
Tacoma, WA
55 Nancie Payne, M.S.
Don Baker, M.A.
Nancy Holm, M.A.
Pete Terlaak, PCC
Miriam Reiss, M.A.
2005
Healing ADD Public Talk 250 Daniel Amen, M.D. 2005
3rd annual ADHD conference Public/Professionals
Tukwila, WA
290 John Ratey, M.D.
Angela Tzelepsis, PhD
2005
4th Annual Managing ADHD in the Classroom Teachers’ Workshop
Tacoma, WA
80 Ted Mandelkorn, MD,
Judy Anderson, M.A.
Jim Rich, M.A.
January, 2006
1st annual ADHD conference for
parents, young adults & professionals
Public/Professionals
Tukwila, WA
390 Peter Jenkins, M.D.
Chris Zeigler-Dendy, M.A.
March, 2006
2nd Annual ADHD in the Workplace Workshop Public workshop
Des Moines, WA
55 Nancie Payne, M.S.
Don Baker, M.A.
Nancy Holm, M.A.
May, 2006
4th annual ADHD conference Public/Professionals
Tukwila, WA
185 Bill Dodson, M.D.
Gabor Mate’ M.D..
October 7-8, 2006
Understanding ADD and ADHD: Keys to School Success Teachers Workshop
Bellevue, WA
120 Chris Zeigler Dendy, MA
Ted Mandelkorn, MD
October 13, 2006
5th Annual Managing ADHD in the Classroom Teachers’ Workshop
Highline, WA
60 Ted Mandelkorn, MD,
Judy Anderson, M.A.
January, 2007
5th Annual ADHD conference for
parents and
professionals
Public/Professionals
Tukwila, WA
180 Thomas Phelan, Ph.D.
Sam Goldstein, Ph.D.
March 3-4, 2007
Healing ADD Public Talk
Seattle, WA
180 Daniel Amen, M.D. April, 2007
6th Annual: ADHD: What Is Someone with this Diagnosis Doing in Your Caseload? ADHD All-Day Workshop
Seattle, WA
70 Daniel Amen, M.D. April, 2007
7th Annual: Solving the Puzzle of ADHD – Annual Fall Conference Public/Professionals, Seattle, WA  100  William Dodsen, MD November 2008
Strategies for School Success  Educators/Parents Workshop  120  Chris Zeigler Dendy April 2009
Making a Good Brain Great  Evening Event  50  Daniel Amen, MD May 2009
8th Anual: Acceptance is Empowering Fall Conference  Public/Professional Bellevue, WA  250  Ari Tuckman, PsyD, MBA, Gina Pera November 2009
 ReTool Your Classroom  Educators Workshop Renton, WA  60  Sandra Rief, MA  February 2010
 9th Annual: Healing the Scattered Mind  Public/Professional Bellevue, WA  200  Gabor Mate, MD, Nancy Ratey, MCC  October 2010
 ReTool Your Classroom  Educators Workshop Portland, OR  30  Sandra Rief, MA  November 2010
 Creating Capable Effectual Learners  Educators Workshop Renton, WA  50  Silvia DeRuvo  March 2011
 10th Annual Fall Conference  Public/Professional Bellevue, WA  ????  Rick Green  October 2011

In Memory of ADD Resources

ADD Resources' history, its people and many services. Leave a comment on how the group has impacted your life. Help put into words the legacy of this vital Pacific Northwest organization. Celebrating 22 years of Service – ADD Resources, a non-profit serving the ADHD community in the Pacific Northwest, closed its doors in March of 2016.

Please leave a comment below or visit the ADD Resources’ Facebook page to leave a message if your life was touched because they existed.

Has the quality of your life been changed by the services they offered? Maybe you found a treatment provider that finally understood? Perhaps you’re a parent who learned to advocate for their child who now enjoys going to school each day. Did you make a new friend or two – someone who understands the way you operate? Maybe you found a favorite book or listened to podcasts from their Members’ Library that helped you cope better with the challenges of ADHD. Did just knowing that you were not all alone make all the difference?

Your are the lasting legacy of ADD Resources. Won’t you please share a bit of your story?

Unrecognized, ADHD may damage lives and relationships. Diagnosis and effective treatment can bring understanding and healing.  ADD Resources promoted ADHD awareness through their publications, website, and educational events. Yearly workshops taught teachers how to deal with ADHD in the classroom and the conferences helped other professionals learn how to deal with ADHD in their caseload. Through the ADHD Directory, they helped link you to the providers you needed. They also offered direct help to many people who’s lives are affected by ADHD. The opportunities for involvement, support, and education they offered through the years were numerous, especially to those of you who could attend a local support group and/or a special event they put on. Celebrate the work and/or people that made the organization special.

0 1 Letter

You may remember some of these Past and Present Group Leaders. Leave a note for them if you wish to thank them for their efforts. Happily, some support groups remain in the Puget Sound region. Find them here: ADHD Support groups in Washington State.  Get on their mailing list if you’d like to be kept up-to-date.

Since 1994, ADD Resources was there to help you find the information, advice and help you need to cope with the many challenges of ADHD. One of the best things was being able to call up and get a helpful and caring person on the line. With the office closing down, here are a few other ways to find quality information and support for ADHD. It won’t be the same, but there are other organizations that can still help.

There’s much more to know about the History and People of ADD Resources. I’ve written an article and put together a collection of names of the many people we have to thank for their efforts in building and sustaining the organization for so long. Click here to read more.

 

Joan Riley Jager – If you’d like to leave a personal message, you can contact me at joanrileyjager@live.com.

In Memorium photo: “Image courtesy of winnod/FreeDigitalPhoto.net”  Poster created on Canva

Again, Please leave a comment below or visit the ADD Resources’ Facebook page to leave a message honoring the work and/or people that affected so many lives.

( My Spam program holds comments for approval before they are posted. My apologies for the delay. I do monitor the site throughout the day. If this is a problem, Facebook may be the better option for you. )

 

 

ADD Resources – 20 Years a Fan

0 1 20 yearsJust after I graduated from college at forty, I found a note posted in the library about a support group for adults with ADHD. I’d just read “You Mean I’m Not Lazy, Crazy or Stupid?” by Peggy Romundo and Kate Kelly. Maybe ADD was one of the reasons it had taken 18 years to finish my degree. I thought I’d look into the group.

Within months, I’d begun volunteering for mailing parties and had been drafted to serve as a board member. Every meeting was a new opportunity for learning and each volunteer effort a time for sharing stories. I’d found a refuge where my talents were appreciated and my problems understood. I was not only getting better, I finally belonged.

0 1 CynthiaHammerEarlyCynthia Hammer, MSW founded our first support group in Tacoma, WA in 1993. Established as a non-profit a year later as ADDult Support of Washington, Cynthia became the unpaid director. She and other professionals she’d approached to contribute compiled the ADDult ADD Reader to raise funds. In 1995, we started a quarterly newsletter, ADDult ADDvice, packaged it with the ADD Reader and an ever-growing lending library of books, tapes and videos as benefits of membership. We also began hosting public talks, professional workshops for treatment providers and teachers, one-day workshops for parents and others for on work and relationship issues for adults.

Many of our events relied on presenters speaking for gratis or at a discounted rate. For many years, all promotion, preparation, and hosting duties relied on volunteers and board members recruited by Cynthia.

2002 was a banner year. We merged with the Seattle ADHD Support group and changed our name to ADD Resources to reflect expanding our services to parents. By the following year, we’d opened an office, hired staff and hosted our first annual conference. I worked part-time in the office, taking phone calls and meeting new visitors looking for answers. A few became vital volunteers.

We also added additional support groups, 2 of them for parents – each with their own library. 2004 connected us to a wider audience with the new version of our website and the National Providers Directory. Cynthia wrote a monthly e-news. Just notes really, but always packed with new sources of information she’d found online. To provide support via the web, Cynthia approached presenters to provide free monthly podcasts. We soon added another each month. Over 100 are now saved in the Podcast/Webinar archives reserved for members.

Cynthia retired at the end of  2007. I left at the same time. Francine Lawrence replaced Cynthia, with Kathy Engle serving as the office manager. Kathy took over the reins as Executive Director a year later and managed the organization for 3 years. I returned to work with Kathy as a volunteer. The office was getting busier with more calls for help from further away. Making connections among the growing number of available providers and services available for ADHD showed how far the field had grown since the organization was begun. We started a Facebook page to serve a wider audience and opened an online bookstore which provided additional funding until Amazon began selling many of our titles at a better price.

Events were getting more professional but still depended on the kindness of local providers, both to present and promote. Board members and select volunteers provided hosting duties with the event facility providing basic services. Kathy Engle, Dr. David Pomeroy and other members of the Board of Directors also updated The ADHD Reader in 2011, seeking new articles on the latest information about both children and adults. Several new support groups were started, but keeping facilitators was a problem. We owe those who have served faithfully as group leaders a debt of gratitude.

Kathy’s departure brought difficult times. The duties of the director of a non-profit organization involve combining the support and efforts of many good people and transforming them into services that inspire and benefit many. Filling the position is not an easy task. For nine months, Steve Curry served as the interim director in addition to his full-time job. Brandon Koch worked part- time and we carried on as we were able. Thanks to hours of overtime, Steve pulled off the planned conference, but we had to close the bookstore and the lending library, and began using email and the answering machine to cover the hours when no one was in the office. Webinars also fell by the wayside. Many of the services we’d pioneered were now available elsewhere.

Laura Del Ragno took over in early 2013 but on a part-time basis. She had two months to plan, promote and host a workshop on relationships and we’d lost our office lease. Seeking to protect the membership section of the website, access to the many articles that had previously been public became inaccessible. Navigating the website became a frustrating experience. When Laura left, Brandon continued on, working with the office manager, Janice Tharp, and occasional volunteers.

0 1 MegMcDonald1Late in 2013, Megan McDonald was brought in as the new executive director. Due to the lack of continuity during the previous years, she and her staff have a steep learning curve. They need to recreate infrastructure, connect with old friends and supporters of the organization as well as redesign the website. Meanwhile, the board has been revitalized. They are asking for the help of volunteers and members to maintain and rebuild ADD Resources into a vital organization by providing both local support and information through web services.

We now host 6 support groups in Washington state including one for partners. Three more are planned to open by 2015. Working towards building the faith and loyalty of members whose support continues to drive the non-profit’s funding base will take time. But, with your help, those who work with and for the organization will be able to serve the ADHD community well through the coming years.

Editors note: Unfortunately, the organization was unable to recover financially and did close its doors in March of 2016. If you would like to share some way that the people or services of ADD Resources impacted your life, please visit the Memorial page and leave a comment.

0 Website headshotI retired last year. I still go the meetings every month.

Joan Riley Jager (2014)

Note:  In the three years since retirement, I have curated a Pinterest page with over 15,000 pins about ADHD and related topics. I now have almost 10,000 followers. February 29, 2016

 

Visit ADHD / ADD freeSources’ profile on Pinterest.

Photo credits – Since 1994 photo created by Meg McDonald – Poster created on Canva