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Treatment for ADHD and Addiction

New treatments combine medication for ADHD, drug detox and therapy.

by Trey Dyer

About 4.4 percent of American adults — 10 million people — have ADHD. And roughly 8 million children have been diagnosed with the disease, making it one the most commonly occurring mental health disorders in the United States.

 

The rate of co-occurring substance use disorders is high among those with ADHD. Individuals with this diagnosis are 2.5 times more likely to develop a substance use disorder. A study by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital found that 15 to 25 percent of adults who have a substance use disorder also have ADHD.

 

For co-occurring ADHD and substance abuse disorders, the best treatment programs combine medical treatment for ADHD, drug detox and therapy that addresses both disorders. Additionally, proper ADHD treatment during childhood can prevent further development of the disorder that may lead to a substance use disorder during adulthood.

 

The risk for substance abuse is often higher for people with ADHD. Compared to the general population, people with ADHD are:

  • Three times more likely to develop a nicotine use disorder
  • Two times more likely to develop an alcohol use disorder
  • Two times more likely to develop a cocaine use disorder
  • 5 times more likely to develop a marijuana use disorder

 

Research shows that those with ADHD may have lower levels of dopamine — the brain chemical responsible for reward-seeking behavior — and turn to substance abuse or other dopamine-releasing behaviors as a result.

 

Despite the increased risks, those with co-occurring ADHD and substance use disorders are not doomed to struggle with addiction their entire lives. Many rehab centers offer specialized programs for co-occurring disorders that focus on treating the separate disorders concurrently, giving patients a realistic chance of reaching recovery and living a healthy life.

Treatment for Co-Occurring ADHD and Substance Use Disorder

 

Treatment for co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders is most effective when the disorders are treated simultaneously. Addressing them at the same time is preferred to treating them one at a time, which was the generally held practice in the past.
Medication is the most common form of treatment for ADHD, and with proper use, it can greatly benefit those with co-occurring ADHD and substance use disorders. Stimulant and nonstimulant medications can be effective in treating individuals with ADHD with or without a co-occurring substance use disorder. The most common types of medications used to treat ADHD are stimulants.

Stimulant Medications

A study by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital examining the results of six long-term studies found that stimulant treatment for ADHD during youth leads to reduced risk of developing a substance use disorder during adolescence and adulthood.

 

The two most common stimulants used to treat ADHD are methylphenidate and analogs of amphetamine.

 

Amphetamine medications activate the reward pathway and trigger the release of dopamine in the brain, bringing balance to dopamine levels among those with ADHD. This can help alleviate drug cravings.

 

According to researchers at Columbia University, clinical trials of Ritalin (methylphenidate) have also been effective in reducing symptoms of ADHD and substance use disorder when combined with relapse prevention therapy. The drug has a relatively low risk of abuse under proper medical supervision.

 

Methylphenidate has been used for decades to treat ADHD and has shown to be effective for children and adults. Uncontrolled trials of methylphenidate have shown to have a positive impact in reducing symptoms of ADHD and cocaine use disorders, according to researchers at Columbia University.

 

Nonstimulant Medications

 

Some nonstimulant medications can be used to treat ADHD and may present an alternative to stimulants. While stimulants have a higher abuse potential, nonstimulants are often seen as a less effective treatment option.

 

Atomoxetine is a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor that can be used to treat ADHD. It affects those with ADHD similarly to stimulants, but in a more gradual manner. With no known abuse potential, atomoxetine is an attractive alternative to stimulant medications.
Tricyclic antidepressants have also been used to treat ADHD. However, they are generally less effective than stimulants in treating ADHD.

Problems with Medication Treatment

 

Research from Massachusetts General Hospital shows medications that are effective in treating adult ADHD may be effective for adults with ADHD and co-occurring substance use disorders, but the medical benefits of the medications are hindered if an individual is actively abusing substances.

 

Challenges of treating patients with a substance use disorder include:

 

  • Patients may not take medications reliably.
  • Patients may require higher doses in order for a medication to be effective.
  • The presence of other substances in a patient’s system may make the therapeutic effects of a medication less effective.

Individuals actively engaging in substance abuse are more difficult to treat with medication, with or without a co-occurring disorder.

 

Alcohol and ADHD Medications

 

ADHD medications are associated with high risks when used concurrently with alcohol. Adderall is a medication of particular concern because it is commonly abused by college students who participate in binge drinking culture at parties, bars and nightclubs.

Individuals who abuse Adderall and alcohol together find that the depressant alcohol effects are lessened by the stimulant properties of Adderall, allowing them to drink more for longer periods of time.

Abuse of Adderall or other ADHD medications while drinking may cause people to consume hazardous amounts of alcohol. ADHD medications that block the depressant effects of alcohol may cause individuals to ignore signals from their bodies that they have had enough to drink, which can lead to dangerous health concerns such as alcohol poisoning.

It is crucial for people to consult their doctor about alcohol use while taking any type of ADHD medication.

 

About the Author: Trey Dyer is a writer for DrugRehab.com. Trey is passionate about breaking the stigma associated with drug addiction in the United States. When Trey is not writing, he can be found fly fishing, playing soccer or cooking BBQ.

 

Sources:

 

Adler, L. et al. (2005, March). Long-term, open-label study of the safety and efficacy of atomoxetine in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: an interim analysis. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15766294

Columbia University. (n.d.). Adderall: Health risks when combined with alcohol? Retrieved from http://goaskalice.columbia.edu/answered-questions/adderall-health-risks-when-combined-alcohol

Levin, F. et al. (1998, June). Methylphenidate treatment for cocaine abusers with adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a pilot study. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9671342

Mariani, J. & Levin, F. (2007). Treatment Strategies for Co-Occurring ADHD and Substance Use Disorders. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2676785/

Michelson, D. et al. (2003, January 15). Atomoxetine in adults with ADHD: two randomized, placebo-controlled studies. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12547466

National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2010). Comorbidity: Addiction and Other Mental Illnesses. Retrieved from https://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/rrcomorbidity.pdf\

Somoza, E. (2004). An open-label pilot study of methylphenidate in the treatment of cocaine dependent patients with adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15077842

Sottile, L. (2015, October 20). The Disturbing Relationship Between Addiction and ADHD. Retrieved from http://www.vice.com/read/the-disturbing-relationship-between-addiction-and-adhd-511

Wilens, T. et al. (2003, January). Does stimulant therapy of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder beget later substance abuse? A meta-analytic review of the literature. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12509574

 

“Image courtesy of stock photos/FreeDigtalPhoto.net” Modified on Canva

&nbs

My Emotional Journey with ADHD

“I am all that I was, and now I have the potential to be even more.”by Cynthia Hammer, MSW, ACSW – Founder of the non-profit ADD Resources

It Seemed So Easy for Others

Are wondering if you might have ADHD? Will it be immediately clear to you that you have ADHD so you’re able to set about getting diagnosed and treated? Is it the eureka moment that we so often hear about?  Can it be as simple as a parent takes their child in to be diagnosed for ADHD, recognizes it in themselves,  bursts into tears, is diagnosed and treated, and experiences a dramatic improvement in their life?

It Took Me Years

This was not my journey of awareness and acceptance of having ADHD. It took me over a year after learning about ADHD to realize I had this disorder and another year in treatment to develop a positive attitude. For any of you who may be reluctant to start your journey, I assure you that learning to accept and manage your ADHD will bring you more satisfaction and contentment with your life than you have ever experienced.

I Was So Sure It Was the Fault of My Poor Parenting

Although my brother and nephew were diagnosed with ADHD years ago, no bells went off in my head when we started to have problems with two of our children. Russell Barkley, Ph.D, says 40% of children diagnosed with ADHD have a parent with the same disorder while Ted Mandelkorn, MD, says that over 90% of those diagnosed with ADHD have a relative somewhere in the immediate or extended family who also has the condition. I knew there was a familial connection to the condition but thought what our children were exhibiting was plain, old-fashioned misbehavior. If we could only parent better, they would behave better.

And So It Went

Off and on I had read library books about ADHD. Sometimes I would think it described one or another of my sons, but then again, it did not sound quite like them. So it went for several years. Then my husband heard a pediatrician talk on ADHD. He came home convinced it described one son. We took him to be diagnosed and started him in treatment. After a year of attending treatment sessions with my son, along with more reading and attending CHADD meetings, I tentatively told the pediatrician treating my son that I thought I had ADHD as well and he readily agreed!

My Denial Pushed Back Help

The prime reason it took so long to help my children and myself is denial. No one wants to admit there is something the matter. They don’t want to have any impairment. They don’t want to be different from normal people. The condition is called a disorder, such a hopeless sounding label. My relatives with ADHD were having major problems in their lives. I was reluctant to associate my children with the same condition. Wasn’t this consigning them to a bleak future? Wouldn’t it be more hopeful to keep working on better parenting skills than to say they had this disorder? I thought ADHD was a handicapping condition that would be diagnosed and that would be it. I focused on denying the disorder, instead of on how treatment could bring benefit and improvement.

Accepting the Diagnosis for Others But Not for Me

After accepting the diagnosis and treatment for my sons, why did it take so long to see the condition in myself? Denial, along with two other factors, was at work. ADHD is difficult to self-identify because of its complexity and the lack of clarity in the description of the symptoms. One author would stress certain features or describe them in a way that I could relate to. I would say, “Yes, that’s me!” Another author would describe other features and it wouldn’t sound like me! I should have paid more attention to the wording that introduces a list of characteristics, where it says, for example, “will demonstrate 8 of the following 20 characteristics.” I didn’t need to have all the characteristics to have the condition, but the characteristics had to be of a degree and pervasiveness that they caused significant turmoil in my life.

Lack of Self-Awareness Made It So Hard

The other factor that makes self-identification difficult is related to an ADHD characteristic, a  lack of self-awareness. For example, I could feel I had offended a coworker, but I had no insight or understanding of how or why. I was too fearful of what they might say to ask them. ADHDers do not realize how they come across to others. (This is why it is helpful to have outside evaluations of your behaviors from people closely associated with you.) In many ways, people with ADHD delude themselves that they are doing just fine; it’s the others that they work with or associate with who have the problems. ADHDers always have good reasons to justify why they did something the way they did, and they do not understand why others might have a problem with that.

My Son Helped

My lack of self-awareness made me unable to examine my own actions and say to myself, “This is typical ADHD behavior.” However, I was able to look at my son’s troublesome behaviors and recognize that I did similar things. What he did (or did not do) that annoyed me were things that I did! As I analyzed my son’s annoying behaviors, I began to have some understanding of how I annoyed and frustrated others.

My Supervisor Helped

Another factor in my developing awareness was my supervisor. Her grandson recently had been diagnosed with ADHD, and she had read about the condition. She knew my two children had been diagnosed, and we sometimes would share information. During my annual evaluation, she brought up some points about my work that could use improvement, e.g., my inability to be a team player; my penchant for getting excited about a new project, but dropping it when only partly finished, blithely expecting someone to finish it because I had moved on to other things; and my not prioritizing my work so that the most important things got done. She said I was a mixed bag and that made it hard to evaluate me. I did some things very, very well and other things inadequately. I recognized these behavior patterns as common to ADHD. When I mentioned that I thought I might have ADHD (again my tentativeness), she said she thought so too.

Treatment Brought Me Relief

After getting diagnosed by a knowledgeable physician, I entered treatment, and like the condition itself, my emotions became very complicated. Of course, I felt relief, mentally saying over and over again, “So that explains it!” After starting on medicine, I immediately noticed improvements in my functioning and relationships. The education and counseling I received helped me learn which behaviors were related to ADHD, and I instituted techniques for managing or minimizing their disruptive influence. So it surprised me, when almost a year after being diagnosed, I blurted out, “I’ve been in a grieving process.” I hadn’t been aware of feeling this way until the words came out of my mouth.

Yet, I Grieved for the Loss of My Individuality

Why is there grief! I have two explanations. To accept the diagnosis and treatment, I had a loss in my self-image. Prior to knowing I had ADHD, I knew I was an individual. I did some things, maybe many things, differently than others, but I had a pride in most of my characteristics and abilities. Now I was learning that those characteristics that made me special are a disorder. Even though I had not seen the connection, my special characteristics had made my life more difficult than it is for normal people.

I Felt Disabled, Ashamed and Embarrassed

I felt like a disabled person. As I became more aware of how I came across to others, I felt shame and embarrassment. There was something the matter with me. Others could see it. Often they were reacting negatively to me because of how I acted. Even though part of me could see that my relationships were improving because of treatment, another part of me withdrew from relationships. I felt awkward and self-conscious, feeling that I was less than others.

I Grieved for the Life I’d Lost

The second reason for grief was a realization that my whole life had been less than it could have been. If only someone had only known about my ADHD years ago…. If only I had been diagnosed and treated years earlier…. Much in my life would have been better. These thoughts kept going through my mind. I reflected on the inappropriate actions I had taken, the people I had offended, the mistakes I had made. I felt ADD was accountable for all that had been bad in my life.

I Found Others Who Were Angry Instead

Many ADD adults, in addition to grief, experience anger as they recall their life experiences. They have so many unhappy memories of being demeaned, berated, and made to feel inadequate. Now they wonder why no one knew there was something wrong. They wonder why they weren’t treated with more kindness, patience, understanding, and love. It would have made such a difference!

Now, I Am All That I Was and More

With treatment, both grief and anger subside and resolve. I came to realize that knowing I have ADHD did not make me a new person. I stayed the person I was, my unique, special self. Only now I can better control the kind of person I am, and I am better at perceiving how I come across to others so I can adjust my behavior accordingly. Knowing about my ADHD and getting treatment for it did not make me less, as I initially thought. I am all that I was, and now I have the potential to be even more. In this context, I like to think of the American advertising slogan, New and Improved. While I am not a new model, I am an improved one! Life is a continuing adventure.

*About the Author

0 1 CynthiaHammerEarlyCynthia Hammer, MSW, ACSW, an adult with ADHD and the parent of three sons, two with ADHD. At age 49, she learned that she had ADHD and realized she knew very little about the disorder. Cynthia founded ADD Resources in 1994 and went on to become a nationally recognized advocate for the understanding of ADHD among both those who have it and those who treated it.  Cynthia is now retired and lives in Tacoma with her husband.

 

“Photo courtesy of Vlado-Free Digital Photo.net” – Modified on Canva

 

 

 

Washington Nonprofit and State Organizations

Washington Nonprofit and State Organizations for ADHD concerns

Support and Information      Find a provider          Parenting Classes    

 Educational Issues     Low income Help

 

Support and Information 

ADHD and Mental Health Nonprofits

 Parent Support groups Puget Sound area – CHADD – Children and Adults with ADHD

ADHD information and Support   ADD freeSources

NAMI  is the National Alliance on Mental Illness, the nation’s largest grassroots mental health. They work to raise awareness and provide essential and free referral, support, education, and outreach surrounding mental illness.

NAMI Washington has 23 NAMI affiliates  

NAMI – Greater Seattle

 

 Find a Provider

Learning Disabilities Association of Washington (LDAWA) provides a referral service to connect individuals – parents, children, teens, adults, and professionals – with resources throughout the Puget Sound. Learning Disabilities Association of Washington is a state affiliate of the Learning Disabilities Association of America.  New Online Directory

Call 211 to locate appropriate treatment and agencies. There’s also a website if you want to search for  yourself. ADHD, Learning Disabilities or Parenting classes yield good results. Washington Information Network – 211

Washington State ADHD Treatment Providers – Note: ADD freeSources does not endorse or recommend any provider or services listed. Nor should not being on the list affect your choice of provider. Most of these were chosen because they were associated with ADD Resources or local CHADD groups at some time.

Ark Institute of Learning in Tacoma assists students with a variety of learning challenges including; dyslexia, language disorder,  nonverbal learning disorder/visual-spatial processing disorder, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, specific learning disorder or disability, and attention issues. Provides assessments, training, and support – – Nonprofit, but services are billed at a regular rate.

Parenting Classes

CHADD’s  Parent to Parent Training – 14 hour Webinar Course

Puget Sound Parenting Calendar  → http://www.psasadler.org/calendar.pdf from the Puget Sound Adlerian Society (Give it a minute to load) Copy and paste URL

 

Catholic Community Services of Western Washington

Services and locations

Low-cost Parenting classes and counseling available at some locations

 

Education Issues Washington State

Washington P.A.V.E. Parent resource detailing the rights of children with disabilities to a free and appropriate education. 1-800-572-7368.

  • Parent training Centers – Statewide Parent Training Information Center (PTI) is a federally funded program that provides training, resources, and support for parents in Washington State whose children have special learning needs, individuals with disabilities, professionals – anyone interested in people with disabilities. Staff and volunteers work with you one-to-one or provide workshops on various aspects of obtaining appropriate services in the public school system.
  • Conducts workshops for parents and others on laws governing special education, testing and assessment, IEP’s, communication, 504 plans and other topics as needed.
  • Staff assists parents individually to increase skills in working with their children’s teachers, therapists, and other team members to obtain appropriate educational services.
  • Has volunteer community liaisons who assist parents.
  • Provides information about resources and specialists in your community.
  • Has information about resources and laws in Washington and other states.
  • Office of the Education Ombudsman is an agency within the Governor’s Office created to help elementary and secondary public school students and families in Washington understand how the public school system works, how to find education-related resources and how to resolve conflict with schools. This organization is independent and neutral and not a part of the state public education system.

Staff  Seattle office-Toll-free: 1-866-297-2597
Phone interpreter services available
Fax: 206-729-3251
OEOinfo@gov.wa.gov

 

Low Income Help

Diagnosis and Treatment for Children

Catholic Community Services in Whatcom and Skagit Counties offers specialized ADHD assessment, counseling, and case coordination for children of families with low income. Treatment includes collaboration regarding medication evaluation and management with primary care physicians, psychiatrists, and community clinicians. The clinic also provides parent education, behavior management classes, school consultation, and parent/teacher education.

Child Development Clinic – University of Washington has been operating since 1965 and serves approximately 200 children each year. Each child visits the clinic one to three times during the year and is served by multiple clinicians at each visit. About 80% of clients seen at this clinic are less than nine years of age. Over 50% of children served are insured by Medicaid.

Clients are diagnosed with an array of developmental disabilities including intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders, motor disabilities, learning disabilities, behavioral disorders, communication disorders, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

 

Catholic Community Services of Western Washington

Services and locations

Low cost Parenting classes and counseling available at some locations

 

Hope Sparks – Tin Can Alley in downtown Tacoma

Offers core behavioral health programs – Counseling, parent education and family support

 

Please help complete these resources. These are what I had saved in my files from 3 years ago with updated links.  Leave a comment if you know of other organizations and services that pertain to ADHD.

 

Washington State ADHD Service Providers

0 1 Washington ProvidersDisclaimer: ADD freeSources does not endorse or recommend any of the providers or services listed. Nor should not being included on the list affect your choice of provider.  We have not investigated those listed and do not have the ability to evaluate their competence in providing services to families and individuals living with ADHD.

 

 

ADHD Information and Support  

Washington State Nonprofit and State Organizations  

Adult Support groups One group still meets in Olympia.

CHADD sponsors Parent groups in Bellevue, Kirkland, Renton, University Place, and Silverdale.

Doctors, ARNPs, Psychologists & Therapists

Psychiatrists can diagnose and prescribe medications. Other MDs may or may not diagnose, but all can prescribe. Psychologists can diagnose and refer to a prescribing provider. Many Nurse Practitioners have experience adjusting ADHD medications but may not feel comfortable diagnosing.

 

Seattle, Bellevue and surrounding areas

 

Ted Mandelkorn, MD

Puget Sound Behavioral Medicine

www.psbmed.com/

Mercer island

 

David Pomeroy, MD

ADD Center of Bellevue

 

George Glade, ARNP

1800 Westlake Ave N # 303, Seattle, WA 98109

(206) 938-9580

 

Ross Mayberry, PhD

Seattle

Psychologist
Population Served: Adolescents, Adults, and Seniors

www.rossmayberryphd.com/

 

Angela Heithaus, MD

Seattle

Psychiatrist

www.drheithaus.com/

 

Alan Simons, MSN, ARNP

Bellevue
Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner
 Adults

www.allensimons.com

 

Amen Clinic Northwest  – Bellevue

http://www.amenclinics.com/

Tim Earnest, MD

Kabran Chapek, ND – Naturopathic

Treatment combines medication, supplements and lifestyle changes. SPECT Scans are expensive and may not be covered by insurance. Will diagnose and treat without using a SPECT scan- but hourly rates are quite high and they do not accept insurance. However, if it’s a case that has been difficult to diagnose or treat, it may be worth the price.

 

Vern S. Cherewatenko, MD

www.Drvern.com

27121 174th Place SE Suite 202

Covington, WA 98042

(206)362-1111

 

Robert Brian Noonan, ARNP

Mindfulness, CBT

1405 NW 85th St Ste 4

Seattle, WA 98117 (206)452-6009

https://ballardpsych.com

 

Trina Seligman, ND – Naturopathic

Evergreen Integrative Medicine

11520 NE 20th St, Bellevue, WA 98004

(425) 646-4747

eimed.com/dr-trina-m-seligman/

 

Jackson L. Haverly, M.D.

ADD ADHD Center of Seattle

753 N. 35th St. Ste. 305

Seattle, WA, 98103

(206) 286-8352

 

Russell B. Hanford, PhD

400 E Pine Street Suite 220

Seattle, WA 98122

Phone Number: (206) 409-9613

abhc.com

 

Associated Behavioral Health

3 Seattle locations – ADHD Testing

(800) 858-6702

http://abhc.com/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorderattention-deficit-disorder/

 

Mary Lee McElroy, LMHC,CCDCI

Bellevue

(425) 452-9079

 

Clark T Ballard Jr MD.

9725 SE 36th St.

Mercer Island, WA 98040.

(425) 746-2124

 

Jack Reiter, MD

1404 E Yesler Way # 201

Seattle, WA 98122

(206) 328-1366

 

Hallowell Todaro Center
5502 34th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105

(206) 420-7345

http://www.hallowelltodarocenter.org/

Therapists

Lesley Todaro LMFTA, CDPT
Lynne Hakim, LICSW

Beth Dana LMFTA, CDPT

Erik Schlocker, LICSW

Marci Pliskin, LICSW

Jovana Radovic, LMFT

Psych. Testing

Melissa Huppin Korch, Ed.s

Coaches

Megan Reimann

Kathryn Korch, BA, CDP
Paul Abodeely, BA, RC

Medication

Jason Law, ARNP
Karen Boudour, ARNP

 

Divya Krishnamoorthy, M.D. Child Psychiatrist

1914 North 34th Street
Suite 401
Seattle, WA 98103
(206) 965-0030
dr.divya.krishnamoorthy@gmail.com

Maia S. Robison, M.D. Child Psychiatrist

2800 E Madison St #305, Seattle, WA 98112

(206) 328-5760

Carrie Sylvester, M.D., M.P.H. Child Psychiatrist

6100 Southcenter Blvd #300, Tukwila, WA 98188

(206) 444-7900

Douglas C. Dicharry, M.D. Child Psychiatrist
2025 112th Ave NE
Suite 200
Bellevue, WA 98004-2978
(425) 462-9511

Hower Kwon, M.D. Child Psychiatrist
365 118th Ave SE, Ste 118
Bellevue, WA 98005
(425) 454-2911
Fax: (425) 454-2966

Erika Giraldo, MN, ARNP

Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner
Population ServedChildren, Adolescents, Adults

19109 36th Ave W #209, Lynnwood, WA 98036

(206) 390-1968

 

Elizabeth MacKensie, PhD and Steven Geller, PhD 

Child & Adolescent Psychologists – Assessment, Psychotherapy, and Consultation – Population Served: Up to 21

www.west-seattle-psych.com/

Suite 202, 746 44th Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98116

(206) 932-2590

 

SeaMar Behavioral Health Centers – King County

http://www.seamar.org/county.php?xestado=56&xcondado=4&xcondado_n=King

 

Andrea Kunwald, MA, LMDTA

http://www.andreakunwald.com/

Psychotherapy, children, adolescents, and adults

3206 W Lynn St, Seattle, WA 98199

(702) 401-3608

 

Kimberly Castelo, MS, LMFTA

Marriage & Family Therapist  

1836 Westlake Ave. N #303

Seattle, WA 98109 – (206) 954-9102

kimberly.castelo.llc@gmail.com

www.healingmomentscounseling.net/

 

Don Baker, LMFTA – Individual, family and relationship therapist

Therapy groups for ADHD in Seattle or online

1836 Westlake Ave N, Suite 303A

Seattle WA 98109.

www.unpackingadhd.com/

 

Cynthia Seager, MA, LMHCA

206-484-9178

cynthia@cynthiaseager.com

 

ADHD Therapy Groups in Seattle, WA
Psychology Today ADHD Groups

 

North of Seattle

 

Robert Small, MD  Psychiatrist

7001 220th St SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043

(425) 918-4573

 

Eastside Psychological Associates

Independent Practitioners – Eastside and greater Seattle area.  Offices in Issaquah Snoqualmie, and Woodinville. Everett Clinic – Search under behavioral health brought up over 25 providers north of Seattle. Referral line is 425-458-5048. info@eastsidepsychologicalassociates.com

 

 

Tacoma

Rainier Associates

George  F. Jackson III,  MD –

James Dale Howard, MD

(Fletcher Taylor, MD is very experienced, but seldom has an opening)

Steve Parkinson, PhD also does ADHD Assessments

Trust the front desk, but be clear about what you need.

5909 Orchard St W

University Place, WA  98467

(253) 475-6021

 

Robert Sands, MD (& Associates)

Child Psychiatrists- will work with adults)

Bellmore Center

3609 S 19th St

Tacoma, WA 98408

253-752-6056

 

Dr. Stephen Schilt, MD- (Child Psychiatrist)

7609 6th Ave

Tacoma, WA 98405

 

Union Ave. Neurobehavioral Clinic

Child Psychiatrists- Will also diagnose and treat parents of the children they treat)

Carl Plonsky and Associates

Dr. Heather Daniels and others

1530 S. Union Suite 13

Tacoma, WA 98405

(253)759-5340

 

Lance A. Harris, PhD – Neuropsychologist

3001 East J Street

Tacoma, WA 98404

Phone: 253) 274-9733

 

Edwin Lawrence Hill, PhD – Neuropsychologist

2013 South 19th Street

Tacoma, WA 98405

Phone: (253) 383-3355

 

Daniel Wanwig, MD – Adult psychiatrist

1901 South Union Avenue Suite A305

Tacoma, WA 98405

Phone: (253) 272-3031

 

Patrick Joseph Donnely. MD – Adult psychiatrist
3609 South 19th Street

Tacoma, WA 98405

Phone: (253) 381-3071

 

Robert Grumer, DO, Ann Marie Branchard, MD and Todd Clemens, MD

Tacoma Behavioral Health Svs – Group Health

4301 South Pine Street Suite 301
Tacoma, WA98409

(253) 476-6500

 

Penny Tanner, ARNP

7424 Bridgeport Way W Ste 302

(253) 581-6106

Deborah Brown, ARNP

Fircrest area (253) 565-1678

 

Robert Kopec, ARNP

4009 Bridgeport Way SW Ste. A

University Place, WA 98466

(253) 503-6761

http://www.pugetmentalcare.com/

 

Allenmore Psychological Associates,

10 Psychologists, 1 prescribing ARNP

1530 South Union Suites 14 and 16

Tacoma, WA

(253) 752-7320

 

Paul DeBusschere, MD FAAP

Belinda Rowe, MD and John Hautala, MD. FAAP

http://www.universityplacepediatrics.com

1033 Regents Blvd, Fircrest

253-565-1115

 

Advanced Behavioral Medicine & Neuropsychology Associates, Inc.

Edwin Hill, PhD, ABDA (Associates- Donna Lidren, PhD; Kathy Brzezinski-Stein, PhD; Barbara Dahl, PhD)

(253) 383-3355   Fax:   (253) 383-3627

Email:   foredhill@msn.com

2013 South 19th Street

Tacoma , WA    98405

 

William Melany, M.A., LMFT, LMHC

(206) 903-9506  Fax:   (253) 759-7129

wmeleney2@earthlink.net

3609 S. 19th St.  – Tacoma, WA     98405

 

CLINICS

Comprehensive Life Resources Adults and Children

http://comprehensiveliferesources.org/

Individual and family counseling, Case management, Group Therapy, Psychiatric services and medication management. Partners with Tacoma schools to offer counseling at schools, Services also available in Gig Harbor. http://comprehensiveliferesources.org/Counseling.html

Must call for information 253-396-5800

1305 Tacoma Ave S Ste 305
Tacoma, WA 98402
(253) 396-5000

 

SeaMar Behavioral Clinics

Tacoma, Puyallup and Gig Harbor

http://www.seamar.org/county.php?xestado=56&xcondado=5&xcondado_n=Pierce

 

 

 

Olympia

 

John Holtum. MD – Behavioral Health Research

4422 6th Ave SE

Lacy, WA 98503

360-403-4437

David Penner MD PLLC
324 West Bay Dr NW
STE 214
Olympia, Washington 98502
(360) 339-8759

Laura Wagner, ARNP

Sound Psychiatric Solutions, LLC
1800 Cooper Point Road SW
Building 12
Olympia, Washington 98502
(360) 633-2819

Edward Case, MD

200 Lilly Road NE, Suite B-3
Olympia, Washington 98506

 

SeaMar Behavioral Health Clinics in Thurston County

http://www.seamar.org/county.php?xestado=56&xcondado=6&xcondado_n=Thurston

 

 

Gig Harbor

 

 

Michael R. Pearson, MD Psychiatrist

5801 Soundview Dr # 251, Gig Harbor, WA 98335

(253) 858-3464

 

Dr. Vanraj C. VaruPsychiatrist
7191 Wagner Way NW – Gig Harbor, WA 98335
(253) 514-8076

 

Munn, Helen, ARNP

4700 Point Fosdick Dr NW Ste 302
Gig Harbor, WA   98335
(253) 851-3808

 

Brace, Melanie, ARNP

6401 Kimball Dr. Ste. 104
Gig Harbor, WA   98335
(253) 853-3888

 

Sara J. Weelborg, ARNP

http://www.saraweelborg.com/

6625 Wagner Way, NE Ste 250

Gig Harbor, WA 98335

360-516-0068

 

Brian O’Connor – Therapist

boconnor@harborwellbeing.com

4700 Point Fosdick Dr. NW #302, Gig Harbor, WA 98335

(253) 851-3808

 

 

Peninsula

Peninsula Psychological Center

4 locations- Silverdale, Poulsbo, Bainbridge Island and Port Orchard

http://www.kitsapcounselor.com/

W. Steven Hutton, M.D.
Pediatrician
1100 Basich Blvd, Aberdeen, WA 98520
(360) 532-1950

 

Puyallup

 

Penlaver and Associates

319 9th Street NW

Puyallup, WA 98371

253-848-0351

 

Woodcreek Behavioral Health

1706 S Meridian # 120

Puyallup, WA 98371

 

 

 

Woodcreek Pediatrics

11102 Sunrise Blvd East

Puyallup, WA 98374

253- 848-8797

 

 

 

Spokane

 

Hi Young Lee, MD  – Family physician

17 E Empire Ave

(509)328-3430

 

Mira G, Narkiewicz, MD – Psychiatrist

140 South Arthur St. Suite 690

Spokane, WA

(509) 462-4567

 

 

Coaches

 

Margit Crane Luria aka Yafa Luria Parent and teen coach –

http:// Margit Crane.com – Blacked to Brilliant – Copy and paste URL

555 116th Avenue NE

Suite 242

Bellevue, WA. 98004

Online classes and coaching – Free presentations for PTAs and sometimes other venues

 

Amy Voros

amy@creativecatapultcoach.com

2226 Eastlake AVE E, #135 Seattle, Washington 98102

(Adults, teens and college students)

 

Pete Terlaak

www.coachforfreedom.com – Copy and paste URL

 

Viveca Monahan

http://coachviv.com/

viv@coachviv.com

 

Noami Zemont, PhD

Mindfulness -Energy coach

www.momentumconnection.com

 

Mimi Handlin, MSW

ADD Family Coaching- Adults, college students, and teens

http://addfamilycoaching.com/

 

Hope Sandler Russell

(Seattle) Group coaching (206) 499-9595 –

hope.sandler@gmail.com –

http://www.coachingadd.net

 

Hallowell Todaro Center

http://www.hallowelltodarocenter.org/

Coaches

Megan Reimann

Kathryn Korch, BA, CDP
Paul Abodeely, BA, RC

5502 34th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105

(206) 420-7345

 

 

Organizers

 

Denise Allan, CPO, CPO-CD

simplifyexperts.com/

8917 NE 198th St, Bothell, WA 98011

(425) 770-5759

 

Steve’s Organizing LLC

5016 74th Street Court East  Tacoma, WA 98443
(253) 229-1237

www.stevesorganizing.com/

 

Cindy Jobs

Serving Puget Sound and Kittitas County

(206) 707-3458 or (509) 674-6643

cindy@organizetosimplify.com

 

Erica DiMiele

www.katharizoorganizing.com/

 

 

 

Advocates, Tutors, Schools & Speakers

 

Larry Davis – Special Education

www.specialeducationadvocacy.org/

(888) 881-5904 / (206) 914-0975

larrydavis@specialeducationadvocacy.org

 

Barbara Bennett, MA

Educational Therapist/Educational Consultant/ADHD Coach
Population Served: Age 4 – Adult

www.barbara-bennett.com/

 

Kendra Wagner

Tutor, researcher, and teacher of teachers. She advocates for children and parents in and out of the school system. She teaches all ages all aspects of literacy and specializes in Dyslexia and ADD. http://www.readingwritingthinking.net/

(206) 947-4478 kendra9@mindspring.com

 

Margit Crane Luria – Parent and teen coach –

http:// Margit Crane.com – ADHD Unlimited – Stuck but Brilliant

 

Online classes and coaching – Free presentations for PTAs and sometimes other venues

 

New Horizon School – Renton

For students with Learning Disabilities, Attention difficulties and Autism Spectrum disorders – 4th-12th grade

http://www.new-horizon-school.org/

 

Yellow Wood Academy

9655 SE 36th St #101, Mercer Island, WA 98040

http://www.yellowwoodacademy.org/

(206) 236-1095

 

Dartmoor School

http://www.dartmoorschool.org/

(425) 503-9847


Schools for learning disabilities in the Seattle area 
– Try a Google Search.

Private Schools with Programs or Assistance for LD and ADD – From the Learning Disabilities of  Washington LD and ADHD Directory

 

 

 

Search Engines

The Learning Disability Association of Washington online directory helps those affected by learning disabilities find resources within the greater Puget Sound region. The directory lists over 800 resources organized into categories ranging from diagnostic testing, consultants, therapists and support groups to optometrists, ADHD resources, physicians, and psychiatrists.

Psychiatric Nurse PractitionersAssociation of Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurses – A simple search provides the most results. (Being updated. Offline until August 15, 2016.)

Washington State ADHD Treatment Providers – Note: ADD freeSources does not endorse or recommend any provider or services listed. Nor should exclusion from the listing affect your choice of provider. Many of these were chosen because they were associated with ADD Resources or local CHADD groups at some time.

 

CHADD Resource Directory

ADHD Professional Services, Parent to Parent Teachers, Tutors, Schools and Support groups

 

Psychology Today Look for Find a Therapist page on Menu – Find Therapists, Psychiatrists, and therapy groups.

Our Find ADHD Treatment and Support  page has a fine collection of Directories to help you find a myriad of services you may need to treat ADHD – It includes:

Find Support
ADHD Directories
Professional Medical Directories
Professional Medical directories with ADHD search option
Questions to help find the right Providers

Supplemental Treatment Providers for ADHD – ADHD Coaches, Professional Organizers, Support groups, Lawyers, Educational Consultants, Advocates, Information and Parent support organizations, Private Schools, Tutors,  and Residential Treatment Facilities.
ADHD Treatment: Money Matters
Who can Diagnose?
Diagnosis and Treatment concerns

Additional Advice on Finding Mental Health services

 

“Photo Courtesy of Tuomas_Lehtinen/ FreeDigitalPhoto.com” Modified on Canva

 

 

History and People of ADD Resources

0 1 addR logoCynthia Hammer, MSW  was the founder of ADD Resources. Beginning as a single support group for adults in Tacoma, Washington in 1993, it grew to a national organization by offering educational events, building a strong web presence and providing valuable connections within the ADHD community. Ms. Hammer first led efforts to incorporate as the non-profit ADDult Support of Washington in 1994 and served as their Board President for 8 years. In 2002, they joined with the Seattle Adult support group, re-organized as Attention Deficit Disorder Resources, and expanded their focus to include parents and children. Cynthia became the Executive Director of ADD Resources until she retired at the end of 2007.

0 1 CynthiaHammerEarlyCynthia had a knack for inspiring others to give of their time and talents as freely as she did herself. She built the organization one person at a time, finding speakers and authors, collecting volunteers and creating alliances that allowed a very small group of people to accomplish much with very little money. Until ADD resources opened its office in 2002, she shouldered the day to day tasks and relied on the Board of Directors and a solid core of committed volunteers for larger efforts. Later, the Executive Director would have at least one part-time staff member, an intern, or volunteer to help keep up with the many daily and larger responsibilities of keeping the organization functioning well. This may help you remember those who have served as the Directors and staff since 2002.

0 1 20 yearsAt different times during the last twenty years, I’ve been a group member, served on the Board of Directors, and worked an employee under Cynthia, and as a volunteer when Kathy Engle was the Director. I wrote an article for the new Director Meg McDonald in 2014 about the history, work and many of the people involved in ADD Resources over the years.  I called it  20 Years a Fan.   

Here’s the official ADD Resources Mission, Vision and History statement from 2010.

0 1 Talks, WorkshopsEvery event was a new opportunity to build awareness and confidence.  These were great times, getting together with others who understood and had ideas that could change lives. Support groups were always free. Many people formed friendships that provided emotional support and validation that continue till today. In addition, ADD Resources sponsored a number of special events each year that attracted a wider audience. Here are the names and attendance numbers of ADD Resources’ Public Talks, Workshops, and Conferences from 1995 – 2011.

0 1 Our ThanksAn array of knowledgeable physicians, therapists, coaches and professional organizers have shared their expertise with ADHD concerns over the years, covering a wide variety of topics suitable for both adults and parents. Many contributed articles for the Adult ADD Reader in 1993 that are still pertinent today. We had a great collection of reputable and interesting material that helped make our website such a great resource.  We were also lucky to have a number of local professionals willing to present for support groups, at conferences and later for the bi-monthly Webinars. We owe them a debt of gratitude. Here are just a few of the many professionals who helped to provide such a wide breadth of material for us to offer.

 

We did host a final Conference with David Nowell, PhD, and author Gina Pera presented at a Workshop for Adults in 2012.  We also managed a Couples Seminar with Rick and Ava Green from Totally ADD! in 2013, but the days of being able to attract a crowd to in-person events were over. We had already been turning to the internet as a means of providing 0 1 Podcasts and Webinars (1)education. Beginning in 2006, we began offering free Webinars and built an extensive library of podcasts available to members. By 2012, there were over 100 titles to choose from.  For many, recordings were the most convenient way to acquire this knowledge.

Podcasts and Webinars Library

0 1 Board

 

Funding the organization, however, remained a problem which the Board and Director Meagan McDonald were unable to overcome. The office closed in the Fall of 2015. Despite their best efforts, the time had come to close down the organization. Thanks to all the Board Members – Past and Present who worked diligently to keep the doors open for so long.

 

After hearing about the closure of ADD Resources, I created a Pinterest Board using the Way Back Machine to document the people and work of the organization.  Well done everyone! Working together, you’ve made a difference in the lives of many.

Follow ADHD / ADD freeSources’ board Celebrating ADD Resources.org on Pinterest.

nancie_payne2013-09

Note:  While contacting people about this page I found out about the passing a great friend to ADD Resources, Nancie Payne.  Nancie specialized in accommodations for the workplace. We could always depend on her to present at a local group, for a workshop or a conference. Nancie earned our Cynthia Hammer Award in 2010 and served as the Board President for Learning Disabilities of America since 2014. Please see Understood Mourns the Loss of LDA President Nancie Payne.

Joan Riley Jager – If you’d like to leave a personal message, you can contact me at joanrileyjager@live.com.

Won’t you please take a moment to honor the work of this fine organization?  You may comment on Facebook or on our Memorial page.

ADD Resources Directors and Staff

0 1 CynthiaHammerEarlyDirector Cynthia Hammer (2002 -December 2007)

Volunteer –  Julianne Owen (2002 – 2003)

Aide- Joan Riley Jager (2002 –  2007)

 

Director Francine Lawrence (2008)

Administrative Assistant – Kathy Engle

Intern – Laura Del Ragno

 

0 1 kathy-engle-website-130x130Director Kathy Engle (2009 – March 2012)

Support Staff – Brandon Koch (2010 – 2014)

Office and Website Volunteer – Joan Riley Jager (2010 to 2013)

 

Interim Director Steve Curry (March 2012 – January 2013)

Staff – Technical Support and Co-ordinator –  Brandon Koch

Volunteer Joan Riley Jager

 

Laura Del Ragno – (January – June 2013)

Brandon Koch

Joan Jager (Until March of 2013)

 

Interim Staff – June 2013 – November 2013

Janice Tharp Office manager

Brandon Koch

 

0 1 MegMcDonald1Director Meagan McDonald –  (November 2013 – November 2015)

Chris Norman, Volunteer

Jill Murphy, Volunteer

 

 

 

 

 

Early Supporters

0 1 Our ThanksI wish I could thank every donor for their interest and support. We couldn’t have survived without anyone of you. Here are just a few examples of the many ways that leaders in the field of ADHD contributed to our efforts.

Drs. Ned Hallowell and John Ratey were early supporters, contributing articles for the Adult ADD Reader that helped fund the organization. Hallowell gave numerous talks in the early years, including a Training Seminar for Professionals and was our first main Conference presenter. Perhaps, your first connection with ADD Resources was talking with Cynthia at home or later calling the office for help after seeing the phone number listed in the Resource section at the back of their classic book,  Driven to Distraction.

We could always count on Daniel Amen, of Healing ADD and PBS fame, to attract a crowd. He often donated his time when presenting for us and once contributed a free ADHD evaluation, complete with SPECT Brain Scans, to a fundraising raffle. Did you enter to win? Ted Mandelkorn, M.D. from Mercer Island was also a wonderful friend. Always generous, he wrote an extensive article on ADHD medication, presented at the first Parent and Teacher Workshops and every conference thereafter for gratis. David Pomeroy, M.D. not only presented, he also served on the Board for two terms. Therapist Don Baker and ADHD coach Pete Terlaak both led the Seattle support group at different times as well as serving as Board president.  (Pete Terlaak – http://coachforfreedom.com/)

Non-profit organizations depend on the kindness of friends and strangers. You could list services for free in Our National ADHD Provider Directory, but many chose to contribute through Professional membership. In time, we built a group of loyal members who provided a solid funding base, but other donations also helped provide services we wanted to offer. Many authors sent us a number of their books to contribute to our growing Lending Library. Sam Goldstein sent us copies of his documentary on Resilience DVDs after presenting at a conference.

Sandra Reif donated enough training DVDs and other material to provide every Teacher a bonus packet worth more than their cost to attend the workshop. Chris Zeigler-Dendy made her great “ADHD is the Tip of the Iceberg” posters available at cost, so we could send them out to schools to post in the teachers’ lounge. Sari Solden came to lead our intimate Women’s Retreat in 2004 and gave a public talk the night before as well. William W. Dodson, M.D. arranged to have his speaking fee covered after realizing how tight our budget was. These are a just a few examples of how strangers united in service became a positive force in spreading ADHD awareness. Please help support those ADHD nonprofits who still serve the public so well.

 

Note: We couldn’t have succeeded without the support of local ADHD professionals. We depended on them both to promote our organization and to present for support groups, a workshop or at a conference.  A large number also supported our work through membership. Many of the providers listed in this informal collection Washington State ADHD Treatment Providers were chosen because of their involvement with ADD Resources or CHADD affiliates.

ADD Resources Board Members

0 1 Board

Always good to see you again. Now, let’s get work.

Our board members have been some of our most important volunteers. Board members play an important role in the governance of a nonprofit. Serving without compensation, they determine the Mission and Vision of the organization and plan how to best provide the services that further those aims. “Rather than steer the boat by managing day-to-day operations, board members provide foresight, oversight, and insight.” (1)They also work to ensure the financial stability of the organization by raising funds and providing careful stewardship.

In other words, it involves a lot of boring meetings, careful planning, following strict rules and guidelines, meeting deadlines and lots of other things that don’t come naturally if you’ve got ADHD. Happily, a number of people, including a few neurotypical types, took up the challenge. It was always a “working board,” with members taking an active role in planning and hosting events as well as tackling larger projects at times. Sometimes it was creating new services and pursuing grants to help achieve them. Twice it involved collecting fresh material  to update the ADD Reader. It’s never been an easy or immediately rewarding job. You had to really believe in the work to keep going.

A few had come to the organization looking for help for themselves or their family but ended up giving much more than they received. Some were support group facilitators who took on the larger leadership role as well. Others were professionals who worked with ADHD concerns, had been presenters, and joined the cause when asked. Occasionally, they were just friends that believed in the value of our work and felt they had something to offer. We’re grateful to have had such a diverse and hard working group of individuals.

(1) National Council of Nonprofits https://www.councilofnonprofits.org/tools-resources/board-roles-and-responsibilities#sthash.toXEpwoc

Current Board of Directors 

Denise Allan

Cassandra Hahn

Cynthia Seager, MA, LMHCA

Angela Heithaus, MD

Jill Murphy

Susan Small

 

 

Past Board Members

David Pomeroy, MD

Todd Erik Henry, JD

Jeffery Wooley, MA

Pete Terlaak

Deborah McGrew, MD

Jennifer Jurik

Steven Engle

Cheryl Comen

Holsey Satterwhite

Steve Curry, MA

Sara Gardner

Terri Walsh

Nancy Walter

David Haapala, Ph.D.

Shirley Carstens, M.S., RN, NCSN, FNASN

Don Baker, M.A., LMHC/Psychotherapist

Shannon Ronald

Judie Bilderback

Gary Dennerline, Ph.D.

Carolyn Delaney, M.Ed.

Joan Riley Jager

Julianne Owen

Gayle Rieber

Cynthia Hammer

(I apologize for not having the names of all of the former Board members. There were many others who contributed before 2002 whose names escape me. These were all  I could find online.)

“Photo courtesy of ambro/ FreeDigitalPhoto.com”

 

ADD Resources – Mission, Vision and History

0 1 addR logoADD Resources

Our Mission The mission of Attention Deficit Disorder Resources is to help people with ADHD achieve their full potential through education, support and networking opportunities.

Our Vision We serve and educate individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, those who interact with them and the community. As our resources and educational services expand, they will be made available throughout the country through technology. We will maintain a primary focus on building community among those who come to us, and we will create a support fund to assure that limited finances are not a barrier to receiving services. We will, as an organization, create partnerships and collaborations for providing more effective services and resources. Throughout all our growth we will maintain quality in all that we do. Our board will exemplify the best in nonprofit governance, and we will maintain financial independence from all special interests.

History of Attention Deficit Disorder Resources

In the fall of l992 Cynthia Hammer was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) by her son’s pediatrician. She discovered Adults with ADD by Lynn Weiss and learned, from the book’s resource list, there was another adult with ADD in Washington State–Lisa Poast in Bellingham. Cynthia called and learned that there were several of us. What a relief and joy to no longer feel alone.

In the spring of 1993, the first national ADD conference for adults was held in Ann Arbor, MI. While there, Cynthia met Brian Howell, also from Tacoma. We decided to start a support group. For over one year we met monthly at Allenmore Hospital. Our attendance ran from three to ten, but the same people rarely came twice. We changed the format to education, more than support, with a speaker at each meeting and time for questions and answers. We relocated to Jackson Hall. With these changes, our attendance grew to forty or more people. We celebrated our 10th anniversary of being incorporated as a non-profit on February 17, 2004.

Since then we have grown to have four additional support groups:

  1. A Seattle adult ADHD support group that meets monthly in the Plaza Café at University Hospital. The usual attendance is 60 or more people. In addition, they simultaneously run a group for non-ADHD partners in an adjoining room
  2. A parents’ ADHD support group that meets on Mercer Island area. This group generally is attended by 30-40 or so people.
  3. A parents’ ADHD support group that meets in Tacoma at Tacoma General Hospital, Jwing, Room #3.  It generally has up to 10 attending.
  4. An adult Support Group that meets in Olympia.

Each support group has membership materials and forms to send monthly reports to the Attention Deficit Disorder Resources (ADD Resources) office. Guidelines for support groups and for Attention Deficit Disorder Resources (ADD Resources) volunteers have been established as well as an application form for volunteers.

We produce theAdult ADD Reader, an l35 page booklet with articles written by adults with ADD as well as national ADD authorities. Past issues of our eight-page quarterly newsletter ADDult ADDvice are now available to members online.  We send out a free monthly eNews to members and nonmembers who have subscribed. Membership is $45 for the first year and $25 to renew. Membership bonuses include the Adult ADD Reader and newsletter, access to the entire website, as well as discounts on workshops and conferences.

We host a National ADHD Directory with over 1000 service providers in the U.S. listed. Currently, listing in the Directory is free. We hope to grow this Directory to over 5000 listings. In addition, our website (www.addresources.org) has over 100 free articles on ADHD. We are working to increase traffic to our website, believing that this will increase membership, a major source of revenue for us.

Each fall we sponsor a conference on ADHD with both national ADHD authorities and local ADHD professionals presenting. In addition, we offer one or more workshops during the year for teachers, parents, adults with ADHD or professionals. We offer teleconferences for those who don’t live in the Puget Sound area. Started the website and National Directory in 2001.

In 2002 we opened an office, legally changed our name from ADDult Support of Washington to Attention Deficit Disorder Resources, and expanded our services to all ages of people with AD/HD. The office is open every day from 10 am-3 p.m. People are encouraged to contact our office for information and support.

Our sources of income have been membership fees, sales of books and materials, an occasional grant, as well as workshop/conference fees.

Won’t you please take a moment to honor the work of this fine organization?  You may comment on Facebook or on our Memorial page.