Author Archives: joanjager@live.com

ADD freeSources – Newsletter – 6/7/2017

Hello,

Welcome to summer. I still feel like having more than 16 subscribers is some sort of cosmic joke forcing me to write on a schedule. I’ve decided that instead of getting out a new post, I’d put together a short newsletter with a few things that I hope you find useful. Not sure just which way to go yet, so I am taking my inspiration from a quote by Sam Goldstein, a pioneer in ADHD research and treatment.

So that’s the tone I’ll aim for. Please leave a comment and let me know whether any of this “hits home” for you. I’m hoping for one comment per one hundred subscribers. Maybe then, you’ll seem real to me.

This is what you’ll find today –

  • ADHD Screening Tests
  • Medication Effects Rating Scales 
  • Reputable ADHD websites
  • Secrets of the ADHD Brain by Dr. William Dodson
  • 7-Steps to Get Fit Gradually by Leo Babauta
  • Executive functions as explained by the Brown Model of ADHD
  • 6 Steps to Survive ADHD Overwhelm – Learn to Plan your Day by ADHD coach Sara Jane Keyser

 

 

Continue reading here 

Take care,

Joan Jager

ADD freeSources.net 

Newsletters

 

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June 7, 2017 ADD freeSources’ Newsletter

ADHD Newsletter - Love, Acceptance and RespectHello,

Welcome to summer. I still feel like having more than 16 subscribers is some sort of cosmic joke forcing me to write on a schedule. I’ve decided that instead of getting out a new post, I’d put together a short newsletter with a few things that I hope you find useful. Not sure just which way to go yet, so I am taking my inspiration from a quote by Sam Goldstein, a pioneer in ADHD research and treatment.

“The most important things we can offer Children and Adults with ADHD are Love, Acceptance, Respect, and Empathy… In the absence of these things, all of the Other things you do are unimportant.” ~ Sam Goldstein

 

So that’s the tone I’ll aim for. Please leave a comment and let me know whether any of this “hits home” for you. I’m hoping for one comment per one hundred subscribers. Maybe then, you’ll seem real to me.

Treating ADHD isn’t easy, but there are ways to make it a little simpler. One of the biggest questions remains whether or not to medicate. Fears of drugging your kids and turning them into robots may inspire you to look for alternative treatments. Some of them, despite little reputable proof of effectiveness, have gained a lot of attention. And that’s Okay. Research takes time and money. Some alternative treatments like mindfulness and Omega 3 supplements are showing positive results.  If you DO decide to try medications, even the most experienced of professionals will be using a process of trial and error to find the correct medication and dosage that works for the individual patient. Each individual’s treatment must be tailored to fit their own needs – to address their symptoms WITHOUT causing intrusive side-effects.

 

Treatment for ADHD is usually multi-faceted. Whether you choose medication, dietary restrictions, neuro-feedback, or essential oils, treatment should also include education, support, parent training, putting new routines and habits into place, and behavior therapy or behavior modification. Whichever methods you choose, it’s important to track both positive and negative results so you know whether your attempts are really making any difference. You could use any of the ADHD Screening tests from my most popular page, but the Arlington Center for ADHD has developed Medication Effects Rating Scales for Children and Adolescents or Adults that will help you record all changes you observe and any negative side effects that arise. For children, the Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale will help you be on the lookout for your child’s emotional and behavioral response to treatment.

 

Don’t just rely on public opinion, popular media or on-line support groups for your information. I’ve put together a collection of reputable ADHD websites so you can choose those that most appeal to you. The more you know about how ADHD affects the brain and how to make that brain work most efficiently, the better your life can become.

 

An essential article to read is Secrets of the ADHD Brain by Dr. William Dodson for ADDitudeMag about what “turns on” the ADHD mind.  Most people, he writes are “neurologically equipped to determine what’s important and get motivated to do it, even when it doesn’t interest them, but the person with ADHD “can’t get started until the task becomes interesting, challenging, or urgent.”  Novelty or something you’re passionate about can also get us going.

 

We need to work with the ADHD nervous system to get things done. You need to find out what gets you “in the zone” and “create your own ADHD owner’s manual.” Taking care of boring, everyday, or mundane tasks is helped by creating structure – developing habits and building routines that keep you on a schedule and help you keep track of ideas, things, and upcoming tasks. These take some time to put into place, but you can make a big difference in your own or your loved one’s life through your ongoing efforts.

 

Even small changes can reap big rewards. This is how Leo Babauta of Zen Habits changed his lifestyle and embraced fitness – Small steps, one week at a time! He calls it leveling up. I used the same idea to lose thirty pounds two years ago. 7-Steps to Get Fit Gradually  

 

Today's hectic world puts tremendous pressure to perform on everyone, but if you have ADHD the pressure is magnified several times over.ADHD coach Sarah Jane Keyser offers a similar process to be more productive and to make your days go smoother in 6 Steps to Survive ADHD Overwhelm – Learn to Plan your Day.

Click through to see the full explanation, but these are the bare bones.

  1. Stop.
  2. Listen to your self-talk.
  3. Make a list of the tasks you need to do
  4. Consider what help you can get.
  5. Plan the day.
  6. Write out the day’s route map

 

I’m pretty impulsive and tend to judge myself harshly for when I make mistakes, so learning to STOP first, take a breath, and get past my self-criticism and doubt freed me to actually take action.  I had always made lists for projects but never thought of making one for each day. It’s called scheduling, but I had no idea how to do it.  Learning to ask for help was tough at first because I thought that I needed to do it all myself to prove myself worthy. Mapping out what to do first, second, and next really helped with doing errands as well as finishing tasks.  I knew I was getting better when I had my purse, keys, to-do list AND I knew where I was going — all before I backed out of the driveway! I’ve been working on strategies to manage my ADHD for over twenty years and I’m still amazed at what I can get done in 15-minutes that used to take me all day.

 

To people without ADHD, these ideas may seem ridiculous, but planning involves executive functions that just don’t come naturally for me or over 90% of people with ADHD. Executive functions are the complex management systems whose development is delayed in the ADHD brain.  As these systems mature,  you develop the ability to self-regulate, helping you to control both your actions and emotions.  A good article with a graphic that may help you better understand this important aspect of ADHD is the Brown Model of ADHD  by Thomas E. Brown.

 

Take it one step at a time. One day at a time. You don’t have to struggle so much.

You CAN live a life of grace and purpose.

I’d love to hear from you. Please leave a comment if there’s anything special you’d like me to address next time. Take care,

Joan Jager

ADD freeSources.net 

All photos courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net and Modified on Canva

ADD freeSources News – May 30, 2017

Welcome. Thanks for inviting me into your inbox. I’m new to having more than a few subscribers, so please bear with me as I try to figure out what you might be most interested in.

If you’re the parent of a child with ADHD, I have a collection of online articles, websites, activities, and videos that your kids might like. It’s been popular in Parent groups on Facebook this week.  See my Kids ADHD Page – Things to read, do and watch.

When you think about ADHD, the controversy about prescribing stimulant medications is paramount in most people’s minds. The decision to medicate is intensely personal and not an easy choice to make. Dr. Ted Mandelkorn graciously let me re-post an extensive article that will increase your knowledge: A PHYSICIAN’S PERSPECTIVE on ADHD Medications – Therapeutic Treatment of ADHD.  Also, Gina Pera wrote a great article this month for ADDitude on 10 Medication Fallacies even Doctors Believe. 

I like Why I Chose to Medicate my Child by Dianne Dempster about how a family that eats organic and prefers holistic treatments for illness came to the decision to try ADHD medication for their son.  “I knew that I could always have my son stop taking the medication; but, if he never tried it, I wouldn’t really know if it would help him or not…Ultimately everything comes back to my son.” If you’re considering a stopping medication over the summer break, ADDitude magazine has an article weighing the pros and cons of medication holidays.

For myself, as an adult with bipolar disorder and ADHD, one of my biggest challenges with the greatest reward has been coming to believe and trust in myself. “For many of us, with ADHD or not, there’s an underlying feeling of not being good enough, wanting to be better, wanting to be in better shape or better at things.” Unconditional Acceptance of Yourself by Leo Babauta of Zen Habits addresses that pain, helping to repair that feeling of being unworthy.

Getting the word out on feeling better about having  ADHD, Kari Hogan of ADDing to the Mayhem shared 16 Steps to Better Self-Esteem with ADHD that details many non-medical treatments that will improve your daily functioning and make you feel more confident in yourself and more in control of your life..  (These ideas work for kids and teens as well.)

  • “Your first step is STRUCTURE.
    By creating structure, each day, you’re giving yourself a reason to wake up and get out of bed!
  • The second step echoes the first step. Set up a daily to-do list. This will give you a sense of accomplishment (it gives you a reason to be proud of yourself).
  • Step 3. FOCUS on your good qualities…”

 

I have the feeling that this is just TOO much information but hope you will find something that meets your needs.

Joan Jager
ADD freeSources.net

Follow ADD freeSources on Pinterest or Facebook.

Tools for Discovering your Strengths

Tools for discovering your strengths. Live well with ADHD. Self-advocacy can give you the opportunity to speak for yourself regarding your needs and help to secure the necessary support at work or school and for your personal life. We don’t have to struggle so hard. Developing self-knowledge is the first stepADD Coach Dana Rayburn reminds us, that, “When properly treated, ADHD loses much of its power over our lives. As adults, we can paint a new picture of who we are and what we contribute to the world…” (1)

The goal is to develop your strengths and delegate your weaknesses.

Don’t go it alone, feeling you have to prove yourself over and over again that you CAN persevere! The truth is, delegating the things you aren’t good at, or just plain don’t like, is a good idea for anyone. If you have ADHD, however, it can make the difference between constant struggle and an enjoyable, successful life.

You are uniquely made and have a lot to share with the world. Don’t let self-judgement stop you from becoming all that you can be. For more about learning your strengths, building self-awareness, and developing powerful self-advocacy skills, continue reading here.

Thanks for signing up for the latest news. Hope you find a new appreciation for your talents and can use that awareness to make your life more rewarding.

I know this can be a difficult concept to get your head around. Let’s talk about it.

Joan Jager
ADD freeSources.net

Follow ADD freeSources on Pinterest or Facebook.

Tools for Discovering your Strengths – Introduction to Self-advocacy for ADHD: Know yourself

20 Momentum Strategies to Combat Procrastination

Lack motivation? Okay. What you need is movement.By ADHD Coach and Organizer, Sue West

Procrastinating or just have no motivation today? Here’s a quick list of 20 strategies to get yourself moving, so you can catch a bit of momentum. As you gain momentum, often you’ll just keep going. You may or may not “find” motivation, but momentum is what’s needed. Not every task you work on “needs” motivation. That’s a feeling, right? What you need is movement.

The Practical Momentum Strategies

1. What’s the most interesting part of the project? Start there.

2. What part of the project will you be best at? Start there.

3. Play first. Get it out of your system. (Set a timer to stop the play though.)

4. Do the difficult first, with “play” as the reward.

5. Set a timer and stop at the end of 5-15 minutes, just enough to get you started.

6. Write or draw out your list of steps and take just the first small step. Just one.

7. Change your environment. Go to someone else’s office, a coffee shop, a library and use the change in environment to wake up your mind.

8. Listen to music (instrumental), TED talks, a book, or a class while you work. Yes, the choice is important, of what you listen to and what you choose to work on. It takes some thought.

9. Work on the tedious tasks while someone else comes to your office or home (e.g., bookkeeper, cleaning service, assistant). Use their presence to focus you on your own task. Or while your children do their homework.

10. Talk through your project with someone else first.

11. Read about how others have handled this project – the experts.

12. Hire it out.

13. Can you work in a team for support on at least one piece? Connections can give you momentum to keep going.

Lack motivation? That’s Okay. What you need is movement.The Psychological, Emotional, and Self-Talk Strategies

1. Ask yourself: Why am I not starting? What am I afraid of?

2. Say something like: I know how to do this. I know I can start it, just dip my toe into the water and see what’s there.

3. Ask yourself: Have I already made some decision? Do I need to let this go?

4. Ask yourself: What is the best and worst that could happen? What are the benefits of starting now versus waiting?

5. Break up the work so you can set small, interim deadlines before the big, looming one.

6. Self-care: Sometimes it’s the rest of your life which is draining your mental energy. Focus on self-care first.

7. Have you ever had this happen before on a similar task? Think about what you did to get started.

A psychologist once told me that you can either start with the practical to get traction, or you can start with the psychological. Either way, both are key elements. So start at one end and work towards the middle and you’ll get what you need.

 

 Guest post by Sue West – Certified ADHD coach, Certified Coach Organizer, Master Trainer in chronic disorganization.  President of the Institute for Challenging  Disorganization – 2015 to present.   For more about Sue and contact information, see: CoachSueWest.com 

Original source

 

Photos created on Canva 

ADHD Coaching Options

Can’t afford a personal ADHD coach? You have other options!

ADHD Coaching groups and other coaching options, including self-coaching. 

Most ADD Coaching Groups are offered periodically by a just a few different coaches. To find them, your best bet may be Google or another search engine.  I do know of a few regular groups. Some are rather expensive, but are still less than individual coaching and a few are quite reasonably priced.

Reach Further – Finally, a truly affordable ADHD coaching group offered by Jennie Friedman. Facebook community for accountability, online meetings and shadow coaching available a few times a week. Try the first month for FREE. Just $29 a month thereafter!

ADHD Coaching Corner – An informal women’s support group led by Elizabeth Lewis with coach Jennie Freidman checking in on Wednesdays.  Meet Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday. Shadow coaching Saturday mornings. Currently just $15 a month, but that’s bound to go up.

Coach Marla Cummin’s ADDed Perceptions Mentor Group 3 months for $150.00

ADHD Success Club with Dana Rayburn – Try for $67 the first month. $177 a month ongoing.  Morning or afternoon sessions on Tuesday and Thursdays. Live and recorded.

ADHD Time Management Intensive from ADD Classes- 4-week virtual classes with Laura Rolands – program $197

 

Group coaching Waiting lists

Small group Coaching with Nikki Kinser – Get on the waiting list ( I believe this is $200 a month)

ADHD reWired Coaching and Accountability group with EricTivers – Limited to 12 persons – Meet three times a week for ten weeks on Zoom – August 23 – October 27, 2017 – Price unknown – Requires an interview to get in and registration is confusing. Some discounts may apply

Virtual Online Group with Coach Rudy Rodriguez, LCSW –  Meet on Zoom Mondays from Noon to 1:30 Eastern – Facebook for accountability. Includes two 15-minute private sessions a month. Folder and handouts – Starts in the Fall of 2017 – Limited to 10 members – Cost unknown

 

Self-coaching

Self-coaching Questions – FREE PDF

Focus to Freedom Blueprint – FREE – Register for next session – 3  video sessions with coach Linda Walker

CreativeGeniusCoaching YouTube channel – FREE – Coach Linda Walker

You are Not your Adult ADHD Workbook – Coach and organizer Sue West – Your roadmap to managing your days. It’s possible. In small steps. Workbook $27. For personal coaching, as well, price increases accordingly. $100 an hour

Maximum Productivity Makeover – Six full video modules with training manuals and workbooks. Accountability group page, Weekly emails to keep you on track – Coach Linda Walker – Self Study is $385

Two other self-coaching programs Walker include video, audio, and workbooks.  Thrive! The Natural Approach to Optimal Focus and Effectiveness for Creative Geniuses and Achieve! The Natural System to Take Control of Your Life and Unlock Your Full Potential for Creative Geniuses  $155 each. 

ADD Crusher – A virtual coaching program from Alan Brown. 10 sessions in two Videos with Audio Companion. Four hours of ADD-beating instruction. Plus, PDF Toolkits for each of the strategies (or, Ways), provide “crib notes” to help you put the learning into action. – $96

The Disorganized Mind: Coaching Your ADHD Brain to Take Control of Your Time, Tasks, and Talents – Paperback book by Nancy Ratey – $12.33

ADHD Self-coaching: Progress Report by Zoe Kessler – 3 months after starting Nancy Ratey’s program outlined in the above book, The Disorganized Mind.

Thrive with ADD Self-Coaching Workshop (Workbook & CD’s) $97 – Bonnie Mincu

Untapped Brilliance: How to Reach your full Potential with Adult ADHD by coach Jacqueline Sinfield – Self-coaching primer written In straightforward language provides practical advice and simple, easy to follow techniques. See Amazon for Kindle version for $10, but order the paperback version from Jacqueline – $15 + $7 shipping from Canada

Oline classes ADHD Classes

3 Core Series ADHD classes with therapist Don B Baker – Change the way you think about and manage your ADHD wiring. Start with Opening the Suitcase for $45. Discount for all three.  Package.

 

***Support groups may also provide information, empathy, and help you with strategies that can lead to self-improvement. Find online and in-person ADHD support.

I want to change my ADHD life. What can I do?

ADHD is a way of life, a difference in the way you see and move in the world. You can learn to manage the world and use your brain.A series of short guest posts by Sarah Jane Keyser.

ADHD has strengths as well as weaknesses; like heads and tails, you can’t have one without the other.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is not an illness (in spite of the name) and there is no “cure”. ADD is a way of life, a difference in the way you see and move in the world.

You can learn to manage the world and use your brain.

There are many ways to train your brain. Usually, a combination of medication, ADHD coaching strategies, and exercise is most effective. Each individual needs to discover what combination works best for him or her.

Here are some ways that you can change your life:

Life Styles for ADHD – You can do many things for yourself. A good program includes exercise, what to eat, how to breathe, how to get to sleep and how to enjoy.

Maintaining the ADHD Brain – If your car runs on two cylinders you take it to the garage. If your brain sputters take it to a doctor for a checkup.

ADHD Coaching Strategies – A coach is a partner who guides you to new ways of seeing yourself and the world. An ADD coach who knows how ADD feels and understands the ADHD brain can help you value your strengths and structure your life.

Celebrating ADHD – Learn to appreciate the passion and sparkle which are the gift of ADHD.

 

 

Published by Sarah Jane Keyser, Copyright 2006, all rights reserved. Learn more about ADHD at Coaching Key to ADHD

 

*** About Sarah Jane *** Sarah Jane Keyser worked for many years with computers as a programmer, analyst, and user trainer, but her struggle with inattentive ADD kept getting in the way of her plans and dreams. Her credentials include ADD Coach training at the ADD Coach Academy, the Newfield Network’s graduate coaching program “Mastery in Coaching” and “Coaching Kids and Teens” by Jodi Sleeper-Triplett MCC. Sarah Jane is an American living in Switzerland who coaches in French and English by telephone.

“Image courtesy of mrpuen–FreeDigitalPhoto.net”   Modified on Canva

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Neuropathology and Genetics of ADHD – 6 Part Video Series

Neuropathology and Genetics of ADHD – DNA Learning Center videos with Professor Phillip Shaw (1 to 2-minutes each)

Neuropathology of ADHD  – Three brain areas in relation to the neuropathology of ADHD: the frontal cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus.

Neuropathology of Attention  – Research indicates a pattern of right-hemisphere dominance for attention in the mature brain.

Adult ADHD – Persistence and Remission  – “Research suggests 20-25% of children with ADHD have a severe adult form, while approximately 33% show complete remission.” –  “In youth with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the brain matures in a normal pattern but is delayed three years in some regions, on average, compared to youth without the disorder, an imaging study reveals. The delay in ADHD was most prominent in regions at the front of the brain’s outer mantle (cortex), important for the ability to control thinking, attention and planning. (Executive Functions) (1)

ADHD Comorbidity  – “Similarities between ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder. The boundary between these disorders is somewhat unclear.”

ADHD, DRD4, and Brain Development  – “Research links ADHD with a variant of the Dopamine RD4 gene, which is also associated with brain development.

Biochemistry of ADHD – Dopamine  – “An association between ADHD and dopamine receptors may relate to brain development.”

(1) Brain Matures a Few Years Late in ADHD, but Follows a Normal Pattern

NIH News Release- Monday, November 12, 2007

ttps://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/brain-matures-few-years-late-adhd-follows-normal-pattern

6 Questions for Recognizing ADHD in Adults

This proposed version of the World Health Organization ADHD Self-Report Screening Scale is a short questionnaire designed to help people easily assess the possibility that they might have ADHD. (Researchers have revised the scale to fit the new criteria for evaluating ADHD introduced by the DSM-5 and to reflect how ADHD  presents differently in adults than in children.) FREE Printable

It’s important to keep in mind that this new questionnaire isn’t an absolute measure of whether someone has ADHD. But it can be a useful tool for assessing whether a further look is in order.

The official screener hasn’t been published yet. At this time,  “scores” would be best guesses based on the following information.

The choice of answers range from never, to rarely, sometimes, often and very often. Never is always zero, but the higher frequency answers are assigned varying points.

  1. How often do you have difficulty concentrating on what people are saying to you, even when they are speaking to you directly?
  2. How often do you leave your seat in meetings or other situations in which you are expected to remain seated?
  3. How often do you have difficulty unwinding or relaxing when you have time to yourself?
  4. When you’re in a conversation, how often do you find yourself finishing the sentences of the people you are talking to before they can finish them themselves?
  5. How often do you put things off until the last minute?
  6. How often do you depend on others to keep your life in order and attend to details?

Points are given to each question according to the relative importance of the question is to diagnostic criteria. The highest score if Questions 1,2, and 3 are answered very often is 5 points. The 4th question’s top score is 2. The 5th’s highest is 4, while the final question is 3. That makes 24 points in total, with 14 points being the point at which additional evaluation is recommended.

We’ve created a FREE Printable of what we think the scale will look like based on the previous information.

 

The development of the new ADHD Screener from a 2017 APSARD conference promotional video – 13-minutes

Sources:

6 Questions for Recognizing ADHD by Neil Patterson – https://blogs.psychcentral.com/adhd-millennial/2017/04/6-questions-for-recognizing-adhd/

The World Health Organization Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Self-Report Screening Scale for DSM-5 

Authors: Berk Ustun, MS1; Lenard A. Adler, MD2,3; Cynthia Rudin, PhD4,5; et al

http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/2616166

Brief Screening Tool for Adult ADHD Released

Copy and Paste: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/878810?src=wnl_edit_tpal&uac=150032AY#vp_2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHO ADHD Adult Self-Report Scale

Proposed World Health organization (WHO)

ADHD Adult Self-Report Scale

     6 Questions for Recognizing ADHD in Adults    Never    Rarely     Seldom         Often     Very

   Often

   1. How often do you have difficulty concentrating on what people are saying to you, even when they are speaking to you directly?        0         1           2         4        5
    2. How often do you leave your seat in meetings or other situations in which you are expected to remain seated?        0          1            2          4        5
    3. How often do you have difficulty unwinding or relaxing when you have time to yourself?        0           1            2          4        5
   4. When you’re in a conversation, how often do you find yourself finishing the sentences of the people you are talking to before they can finish them themselves?        0           1            1           2       2
    5. How often do you put things off until the last minute?        0           1            2           3        4
    6. How often do you depend on others to keep your life in order and attend to details?        0           1            1            2         3

 The total number of available points is 24.

Recommend further testing with screening scores of 14 and above.   

For further information see:

6 Questions for Recognizing ADHD in Adults

Source:  

The World Health Organization Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Self-Report Screening Scale for DSM-5 

Authors: Berk Ustun, MS1; Lenard A. Adler, MD2,3; Cynthia Rudin, PhD4,5; et al

http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/2616166

Brief Screening Tool for Adult ADHD Released

Copy and Paste: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/878810?src=wnl_edit_tpal&uac=150032AY#vp_2